Rep. Jerrold Nadler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, joined at left by Rep. Carolyn Maloney, acting chair of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, meet with reporters to discuss the next steps of the impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Rep. Jerry Nadler is still really desperate to find out what U.S. Attorney John Durham has been investigating as it relates to Russia collusion apparently because, even after Attorney General William Barr agreed a few weeks ago to testify before the House, Nadler is still pestering him with letters requesting Durham testify as well.

“The Judiciary Committee needs to examine a range of recent actions that smack of political interference, including the Department’s withdrawal of the Roger Stone sentencing recommendation; intervening in the handling of the Michael Flynn prosecution; overruling the decision to relocate Paul Manafort to Rikers Island; opening investigations into career officials involved in the Russia investigation; and a series of controversial interventions into sensitive antitrust matters,” Nadler said in the four-page letter.

“Our democracy is founded on the notion that no one is above the law, and strict adherence to the rule of law has separated us from all other nations,” the New York Democrat added. “Attorneys General have supported this principle on a bipartisan basis throughout our history, but that principle is now under assault. There is also a long history of Attorneys General cooperating in oversight inquiries led by both Democrats as well as Republicans, and given the stakes for our nation, we expect Attorney General Barr’s full cooperation here.”

Durham, a top prosecutor in Connecticut, was on the list of officials. Nadler asked that Barr respond by March 13 “given the urgent and serious nature of these requests.”

Durham, as we know by now, was given full declassification authority by Barr and has been on nearly a year-long investigation of the origins of the Russia collusion investigation into the 2016 Trump campaign. Recent reports have indicated he may be turning his eye toward former CIA head John Brennan and how that intelligence agency did — or did not — share information with other intelligence agencies.

Of course Nadler won’t make it obvious that he’s interested in what Durham has discovered while investigating the Russia collusion hoax. So his cover is demand Barr and Durham come in to discuss the circumstances surrounding the four prosecutors who quit after they requested an exorbitant sentencing for Trump associate Roger Stone — and were rebuked by Barr, who followed up with a lighter sentencing request.

But, as Politico points out, Nadler’s letter “also included broader demands for documents and testimony about allegations of political interference by Trump in the work of the Justice Department.”

Uh-huh.

Barr has already agreed to testify, and that may spare Durham, who would likely be compromising an unfinished investigation if he were to go in and be forced to answer questions about it. So Nadler is both pushing for a conclusion to the investigation and is trying to glean as much information as he can under the auspices of needing to know more about the Roger Stone affair.

These guys are really chewing their nails over what Durham may have uncovered and they’re coming a bit undone as they fret over new ways to get Barr and Durham to reveal what they know.

It’s kind of textbook abuse of power. And it’s not unpleasant to watch because whatever teeth they used to have were extracted once Mueller dropped his report and Horowitz dropped his.