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There is so much awesome here that I don’t even know where to begin.

If you’ve paid any attention at all to Donald Trump’s career this will come as no surprise that a man who has made his way in the world as a scam is suddenly, himself, beset by scammers.

As Donald Trump rushes to start collecting the $1 billion expected to be necessary to compete for the White House, one of his biggest challenges may come from those claiming to support him.

An increasing number of unauthorized groups are invoking the presumptive GOP nominee’s name to raise money, suggesting that they’ll use the cash to support his campaign, even as some appear to be spending most of their money on contracts with favored consultants.

Trump’s campaign and its allies worry that the groups are doing little to help the campaign and may be doing more harm than good by siphoning off cash that would otherwise go to the campaign’s fledgling fundraising effort. The campaign has disavowed several of the groups, demanding they stop using the candidate’s name in fundraising appeals and calling at least one super PAC founded by a Trump adviser a “big-league scam.” But appeals keep coming from other groups, with more now joining the scrum, and rival groups accusing one another of being scams.

And money sent to Trump super PACs is inevitably money well spent:

Thus it can be hard for online contributors to distinguish among the groups touting support for Trump. An outfit called Restore American Freedom and Liberty has blasted out emails trumpeting the latest polls showing Trump tying Hillary Clinton, ending with a big red CONTRIBUTE button. According to its campaign finance disclosures, the group has raised more than $215,000 but spent just $2,000 on ads — split between Ted Cruz and Ben Carson. Most of the money went to a New York company called Amagi Strategies, for what the disclosures said was fundraising, management and research.

POLITICO, however, buries its lede. To date the highest profile pro-Trump PAC has been Great America PAC. Naturally, it, like all Donald Trump enterprises, attracts only the best people.

The PAC has spent more than $1 million so far on pro-Trump ads but raised eyebrows with a TV spot that looked unprofessional and asked supporters to call a toll-free number to donate. One of its strategists, Jesse Benton, was convicted this month of buying an endorsement for Ron Paul in 2012. And Amy Kremer, a tea party activist who was an early leader of the group, quit this month over a disagreement with Beach.

The PAC’s treasurer is Dan Backer, whose consulting firm, DB Capitol Strategies, has been paid more than $2,000. Backer is also the treasurer of PACs such as Conservative Action Fund and Tea Party Forward that have spent more on their own operating expenses than on their stated causes.

Nothing increases donor confidence like having a convicted felon and alleged scammer running an organization.

Longtime Trump ally Roger Stone has warned donors to “beware” of Great America PAC, branding it a “scam.”

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Part of this is disgruntlement is because Roger Stone has been raising money to finance his rent-a-mob effort to prevent “vote stealing” at the Cleveland Convention and anything sent to Great America PAC cuts into his ability to finance racists, neo-nazis, and other key Trump constituencies from making the trip.

Not to be outdone, Trump “campaign manager” and vicious niblet, Corey Lewandowski, has accused Roger Stone of running a scam:

“Big league scam,” Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski told The Hill.

“We sent a cease-and-desist letter to this PAC in October and want nothing to do with this,” he said. “These guys are scam artists doing it for their own personal benefit and seeking to profiteer off Trump’s name. People should not give to this or any other super-PAC claiming to support Donald Trump for president.”

Ironically, both Stone and Lewandowski are probably right. The Donald Trump candidacy is a scam, why should his Super PACs be an different?