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Steve Bannon is out of the White House and he’s obviously not all that happy about it. Shortly after his resignation was announced, Bannon acolyte and Breitbart editor-at-large Joel Pollak had this to say–and received a lot of help from the internet:

pollack-tweet

Just a short while ago we learned Bannon was returning to Breitbart and he shared his thoughts about what it all meant with The Weekly Standard:

With the departure from the White House of strategist Stephen K. Bannon, who helped shape the so-called nationalist-populist program embraced by Donald Trump in his unlikely path to election, a new phase of the Trump presidency begins. Given Trump’s nature, what comes next will hardly be conventional, but it may well be less willfully disruptive—which, to Bannon, had been the point of winning the White House.

“The Trump presidency that we fought for, and won, is over,” Bannon said Friday, shortly after confirming his departure. “We still have a huge movement, and we will make something of this Trump presidency. But that presidency is over. It’ll be something else. And there’ll be all kinds of fights, and there’ll be good days and bad days, but that presidency is over.”

I think he gets the situation exactly right. Trump will never be a conventional president but he may become a more disciplined one. What ever credit Bannon deserves for Trump’s electoral success–and I’m pretty agnostic on that claim–he deserves a huge share of the blame for the squandered opportunities and good will of the past six months. It is one thing to be an iconoclast and bomb thrower when you’re running a website, it is quite another to carry that bullsh** over into the governance of the most powerful nation on earth. Particularly when your win was not a popular or electoral mandate.

When Trump was at his worst you never had any problem visualizing Bannon by his side, winding him up, double-dog daring him to say or do something outrageous or to double-down on some ill-considered statement. You can do that if you have no respect for or loyalty to the man you are supposed to be serving and it was pretty clear for quite a while that Bannon held Trump in contempt, otherwise he would have tried to moderate some of his more damaging acts.

Given the jihad Breitbart has launched today against globalists–apparently this is the political equivalent of the cultural epithet “cuck”–it seems like Bannon, instead of supporting the guy he claims to have created, is going to engage in an open revolt to ensure that is Trump not successful.

It will be interesting to see how actual Americans react to this and whether giving Bannon the heave-ho and watching Breitbart start attacking Trump as an establishment sell out is going to have any political impact at all… besides making Trump seem more reasonable.