Over the past couple of weeks we’ve learned a lot more about the unabashedly partisan crew that Robert Mueller has assembled to investigate the Trump campaign’s efforts to enlist Russian aid in winning the 2016 election (and pretty much anything else that strikes his fancy). A quick review:

Peter Strzok was the deputy FBI director for counterintelligence. He’s the guy who rewrote James Comey’s pre-investigation determination of the outcome of the “matter” of Hillary Clinton’s mishandling of email to remove any criminal liability. He is the guy who was the FBI point man for receiving the Trump dossier, getting it vetted, getting it moved into the correct channels, using it to generate FISA warrants on Carter Page and Paul Manafort while they were, respectively, members of the presidential campaign and of the transition team. He was found, by the DOJ IG, to have exchanged numerous text messages with his paramour, a lawyer in deputy FBI director Andrew McCabe’s office who was also on Mueller’s investigatory team, that were pro-Clinton and anti-Trump.

Earlier today, we learned of Aaron Zebley. Zebley’s wife was appointed by Obama to a federal judgeship and Zebley sandbagged efforts by the House Homeland Security Committee to interview the guy who set up Hillary Clinton’s private email server.

Jeannie Rhee has contributed over $9,000 to Democrats in recent years, $5,400 to Hillary Clinton. She defended Hillary Clinton in a lawsuit over her emails. She was the attorney for former deputy national security adviser, failed novelist, and full-time Iranian stooge, Ben Rhodes, during the Benghazi investigation. This is my favorite:

Rhee married the former Christopher Sclafani, who took his wife’s last name, in 1995, after the two met at Yale University. Mr. Rhee, also an attorney, has a history of working with prominent Democrats, serving as a special assistant to then-Deputy Attorney General Eric Holder, and as counsel to Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., on the Senate Judiciary Committee.

(Read this and ask the obvious question.)

Andrew Weissmann, who made a lucrative career of sending innocent men to prison, was one of the DOJ apparatchiks who sent former deputy attorney general Sally Yates a fawning email after she refused to defend Trump’s travel ban in court. Weissmann was also in attendance at Hillary Clinton’s “victory celebration.” While that is not a Hatch Act violation, it, in conjunction with the email to Yates, shouts that Weissmann has an anti-Trump bias.

So, you might reasonably ask, just how partisan would you have to be in order to be too partisan to make it onto Mueller’s team? Rebecca Ballhaus of the Wall Street Journal helpfully provides the answer: