Nikki Haley appeared on “Face the Nation” with John Dickerson this morning. At the very end of her interview she was asked about the sexual harassment hysteria sweeping the country and how it applied to President Trump:


JOHN DICKERSON: Let me ask you about a domestic issue here. There’s a cultural shift going on in America right now. You saw it, three members of Congress kicked out of Congress because of sexual behavior, misdeeds. You were the first woman Senator of South Carolina. What do you think of this cultural moment that’s happening?

NIKKI HALEY: You know, I am incredibly proud of the women who have come forward. I’m proud of their strength. I’m proud of their courage. And I think that the idea that this is happening, I think it will start to bring a conscience to the situation, not just in politics, but in, you know, we’ve seen in Hollywood and in every industry. And I think the time has come.

JOHN DICKERSON: Of course I’m wrong, you were the governor, first governor of South Carolina. Given that consciousness, how do you think people should assess the accusers of the president?

NIKKI HALEY: Well, I mean, you know, the same thing, is women who accuse anyone should be heard. They should be heard and they should be dealt with. And I think we heard from them prior to the election. And I think any woman who has felt violated or felt mistreated in any way, they have every right to speak up.

JOHN DICKERSON: And does the election mean that’s a settled issue?

NIKKI HALEY: You know, that’s for the people to decide. I know that he was elected. But, you know, women should always feel comfortable coming forward. And we should all be willing to listen to them.

That is pretty much my feeling on the subject. Note what is missing from Haley’s statement? “Believe women.” This is what will mark me as a misogynistic Neanderthal to many, but I’ve known quite a few women in my life and I’ve not found them any more likely or unlikely to tell the truth than your typical male.

I’ve found women just as likely to lie for advantage or revenge or attention as men can be. And I’ve found them just as likely to tell inconvenient and unpleasant and career-damaging truths because it is the right thing to do. I don’t believe making an allegation gives you a presumption of truthfulness nor does it create a presumption of lying. It is an allegation.

People shouldn’t be punished for making them, but neither should people be punished because they are accused of something.

In her last statement, what Haley may be suggesting about Trump and his election is right in a way that will also apply to Roy Moore… but did not apply to John Conyers or Al Franken.

The claims concerning Trump and Moore are, and will be, baked into the election results. Voters went to the polls knowing the allegations and had the ability to weigh the seriousness of the charge and the veracity of both parties in the voting booth. They have the information beforehand. They will make the decision on whether that means he should take office. It’s theirs to make. As it should be.

I’m including the Twitter video because sometimes YouTube’s fealty to its corporate masters outweighs its actual concern about how Fair Use is supposed to work.