It Really Doesn’t Matter That Huma Abedin Compromised Secure State Department Networks

Posted at 9:31 am on January 02, 2018 by streiff

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton laughs with patrons during a visit to Dunkin’ Donuts in West Palm Beach, Fla., Tuesday, March 15, 2016. Clinton faces Democratic rival Bernie Sanders in primary contests in five states on Tuesday: North Carolina, Florida, Ohio, Missouri and Illinois. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

 

One of the more bizarre side stories of Hillary’s email scandal was official State Department communications ending up on the personal computer used by Huma Abedin’s ex-husband, former New York Democrat Representative and sexting monster (the aptly named) Anthony Weiner. Apparently, Abedin, on a routine basis, forwarded official email to her personal Yahoo email account.

Thanks to a federal lawsuit filed by Judicial Watch, the State Department has been forced to release some 2,800 documents the FBI found when they busted Weiner for sending sexually explicit images of himself to a minor. Five of these emails were classified. They weren’t top secret satellite imagery like Hillary Clinton stored on her personal server, but they were sensitive enough to be classified. But because Abedin meant no harm and was merely “extremely careless” and no “reasonable prosecutor” would ever pursue such a meaningless case, the FBI didn’t bother charging Abedin with a crime.

One of the more interesting emails contained login instructions to Abedin’s State Department accounts:

As the Daily Caller points out, while this email resided on Yahoo’s email server, Yahoo was breached by Russian intelligence and some 500 million accounts were compromised.

I’m not terribly convinced that this breach is germane to the offense of sending State Department passwords via unsecured email to a third party server. I also can’t imagine that Abedin’s email address had been missed by a multitude of foreign intelligence services–she used her Yahoo account to correspond to clintonemail.com and we know foreign intelligence services were aware of and probably penetrated that account–and that the account hadn’t been compromised.

The idea that a foreign intelligence service had the potential to access classified State Department systems because Abedin sent the passwords to them in the clear to a Yahoo server is rather scary. Hopefully, someone somewhere is concerned but from what we’ve seen of the FBI and Justice, they really don’t care about security breaches so long as you have the correct politics.