The spectacle of the ongoing Democrat civil war has finally exposed the fractures in the Democrat Party that have always existed, especially the prevailing hypocrisy that the Party Establishment are for average people, not Wall Street. The avowed socialists are pitted against the Establishment, and how it is being played out in the legacy media is breath-taking to watch.

Meanwhile, recent polls show more Americans now affiliated as Republicans than Democrats, as disaffected Democrats becoming independents or Republicans thanks to Brandon Straka’s Walkaway movement, Turning Point USA, and other Republican-oriented activist organizations. From a recent Gallup poll, the total of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents is 48%, as opposed to 44% for Democrats and Democrat-leaning independents.

That shift is of course due to President Trump and his delivery on 2016 campaign promises despite the severe political headwinds from Democrats, NeverTrumper “Republicans,” the legacy media, and the federal bureaucracy from the very beginning of his presidency. Tax and regulatory cuts have fueled economic growth and the return of manufacturing jobs, and the USMCA and Phase I China trade deals will boost future economic activity, too.

While the Democrat-media complex have downplayed President Trump’s rallies across the country, those are an integral part of his campaign strategy that is working like a charm. The rallies demonstrate his wide appeal and telegraph the enthusiasm of the rally-goers as free advertisement to Americans around the country. They also serve another purpose, and that is to identify participants and add them to the Trump digital data base in order for campaign operatives to follow up with them after the rallies. This outreach is a big part of the continuing political shift toward the Republican Party, as excerpted from this American Spectator article on Monday:

Brad Parscale, Trump’s 2020 campaign manager, is deploying a small army of volunteers at each of the president’s rallies to identify attendees who may belong to this immense reservoir of potential supporters and convert them into 2020 Republican voters who will show up and cast ballots on Election Day.

After each Trump rally, Parscale posts the percentage of attendees who didn’t vote in 2016. … The campaign isn’t merely keeping score and compiling lists for use at some later date. They are reaching out to these disengaged voters then and there…

Parscale’s outreach initiative is being launched at a time when the Democrats are already losing the registration advantage they have historically enjoyed among the electorate.

[C]ombined with an increasingly fractious nomination race, this outreach program couldn’t come at a worse time for the Democrats.

It’s likely that many of the sporadic voters appearing at the Trump rallies are disaffected Democrats who would agree with Reagan’s oft-quoted reason for leaving that party: “I didn’t leave the Democratic Party, the Democratic Party left me.” That they are showing up at Trump rallies and standing in line for hours suggests they are ripe for harvesting.

President Trump’s message resonates with Americans across the political spectrum, with the exception of the hardcore socialists and other garden-variety leftists within the Democrats’ base. His campaign is capitalizing bigly on the Democrat intra-party conflict, the Democrats’ impeachment farce, Republican Party unity, and his strong leadership record to create an irresistible force going in to November. And the Democrats are too focused on their own political problems to notice.

The end.

Stu Cvrk
Stu Cvrk served 30 years in the US Navy in a variety of active and reserve capacities, with considerable operational experience in the Middle East and the Western Pacific. An oceanographer and systems analyst through education and experience, Stu is a graduate of the US Naval Academy where he received a classical liberal education which serves as the key foundation for his political commentary. He threads daily on Twitter on a wide range of political, military, foreign policy, government, economics, and world affairs topics.
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