The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) virus – see, that’s not racist because I’m blaming it on Commies – has become virtually the only story in the world. It’s covered 24×7 by the legacy media to the point that some people are starting to turn off the news just to get away from it all. Opinions about the virus are as varied as can be imagined, with political persuasion dictating how many people view the crisis. Duration, mortality rate, projected number of cases and deaths, preventative measures, drug treatments, behavioral changes, and long-term lessons-learned. All of these – and more – are common topics of conversation everywhere.

In Part I, the Left’s use of models to achieve political objectives, including during this pandemic, was examined. In addition, some fairly straightforward and obvious lessons learned from this crisis were discussed. The political class has run amok in trying to “do something,” but as usual, the cooler heads are among their constituents, and we need to hear much more from them as this pandemic unfolds. Toward that end, here in Part II, we are going to look at some common sense observations, lessons learned, and predicted positive outcomes as espoused by average Americans. They are presented in no particular order, with my comments after each in brackets [ ].

The first list:

  1. The stigma against telecommuting will be erased. [No doubt about it, and businesses will find that productivity does NOT decrease.]
  2. Handshaking will disappear. [That’s a difficult habit to break, but it’s possible for at least some people.]
  3. Concerts will be diminished. [For a while; then memories will fade.]
  4. People will consume less and save more. [Maybe in the short-term.]
  5. More food delivery/cloud kitchen models, less “restaurants.” [Quite possible. Say “hello” to DoorDash.]

The next suggestions:

  1. Kids are being homeschooled and parents can realize that public education is shit. [Yes.]
  2. Also realizing celebrities aren’t important and we don’t need them. [Big yes here!]

The next input:

  1. Stronger borders [President Trump was right!]
  2. More manufacturing brought home [President Trump was right again!]
  3. Better hygiene practices [Always a good thing; kids might even listen more now, and parents will get serious about teaching them, too.]
  4. No more hugging strangers. [Yes. Will the Europeans “kiss cheeks” after this is all over?]

The next offering:

  1. The 2nd Amendment debate is over and the right to bear arms won. [Even lefties are buying guns now.]
  2. Public schools and universities are being exposed for their inefficiencies. [Stand by for more and better online school.]
  3. Manufacturing will come back to the US. [Will be required to for certain strategic industries.]
  4. Necessity will drive massive health care innovation. [Telemedicine will explode.]

And still more:

  1. Most people are awake about China’s government. [China will be ostracized for at least a generation (or until they overthrow the Chinese Communist Party)]
  2. No reason to have everyone work in an office. [A repeat from above.]
  3. Reusable shopping bags aren’t healthy. [The lefties take another hit on one of their nonsensical issues.]

More:

  1. The EU dissolves completely [Possibly as overreach because the Euro-elite won’t go down quietly, but the virus has shown the ineptitude of Brussels and open border policies.]

I like this one bigly:

  1. People will start questioning global warming models more [This was covered in detail in Part I. The Left use flawed models to drive their policies.]

These are thoughtful:

  1. Trimming the fat on the globalist economy. [Global supply chains are going to be turned upside-down for starters.]
  2. I’m hoping, HOPING that people can see how useless federal regulatory agencies are Looking at the FDA, EPA, CDC, and Department of Education [President Trump was right about cutting federal regulations, too. That’s what’s happening during this crisis with CDC/NIH testing regs, for example.]

Still more:

  1. More value placed on family & spending/making time with/for them [A greater appreciation for family and life, in general, will evince.]
  2. Increase in gun ownership [Already happening!]
  3. More appreciation for nurses, doctors, truck drivers, farmers, etc. [Hopefully, this will last.]
  4. Less dependence on foreign products = “Made in America” [Great for the US economy after this is all over.]
  5. More time spent outside (for adults & kids) [Ditch the electronics? Maybe.]

Still more, part 2:

  1. Stronger border control (hopefully) [A repeat from above.]
  2. Increased focus on supporting local businesses [Quite possibly.]
  3. Exposing of corrupt, incompetent politicians [See Part I!]
  4. Exposing of vapid, out of touch celebrities [A repeat from above.]
  5. Self-sufficient practices becoming more popular (gardening, home economics, etc.) [People might learn how to can food again, too. The preppers were onto something.]

 

Still more, part 3:

  1. Better hygiene & cleanliness (hopefully end of handshaking) [A repeat from above.]
  2. We become healthier overall [Quite possibly, at least in the short-term.]
  3. More flexibility for employees working remotely [A repeat from above.]
  4. The importance of budget balancing makes a comeback [Don’t believe so unless we change out the political class. Future generations are stuck with paying down the economic stimulus bill.]

These are some excellent predictions, observations, and positive forecasts from average people. Have you heard anyone from the political class – especially the Democrat-media complex – discuss any of them? Of course not. The American people will figure things out on a local level long before the fools in Washington, DC will.

The end.

Stu Cvrk
Stu Cvrk served 30 years in the US Navy in a variety of active and reserve capacities, with considerable operational experience in the Middle East and the Western Pacific. An oceanographer and systems analyst through education and experience, Stu is a graduate of the US Naval Academy where he received a classical liberal education which serves as the key foundation for his political commentary. He threads daily on Twitter on a wide range of political, military, foreign policy, government, economics, and world affairs topics.
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