Senator John McCain (R-Ariz.) is decidedly not happy with the timing and method of FBI Director James Comey’s firing.

Speaking with a group of foreign officials, McCain said:

“I regret it, I think it’s unfortunate,” McCain said during a meeting with the Munich Security Conference. “The president does have that constitutional authority. But I can’t help but think that this is not a good thing for America.”

While the reasons may differ, Democrats and Republicans alike have expressed some concerns about the firing and how it was handled.

One theory floating about is that Trump sought to throw up roadblocks to the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 and possible collusion with Trump’s campaign.

The firing came after former acting Attorney General Sally Yates testified that the Trump team were warned about hiring Michael Flynn as national security adviser.

Increasingly, it appears Flynn was in deep. Trump’s decision to bring him into such a sensitive position, only to have to release him weeks later probably doesn’t present the best optics.

However, McCain feels that as bad as the firing of Comey smells, it won’t change anything.

“This scandal is going to go on. I’ve seen it before,” McCain continued. “This is a centipede. I guarantee you there will be more shoes to drop, I can just guarantee it. There’s just too much information that we don’t have that will be coming out.”

If Trump intended to disrupt the FBI investigation, McCain said, it wouldn’t work.

And it shouldn’t. All indications are that Andrew McCabe, the deputy director of the FBI will be stepping up as acting director, and that he’s most capable of filling the role.

McCain said the position as FBI director is “probably the most respected individual in all of the American government,” adding that he is “very sorry that this has happened.”

McCain issued a statement earlier Tuesday saying he is “disappointed” with Trump’s decision, and calling for a special congressional committee to take the lead on the Russia probe.

Whether McCabe picks up where Comey left off, or a special committee is named, I doubt anyone’s suspicions or theories will be easily quelled.

At least not until the investigation is closed.