Well, here’s a ringing endorsement.

On the heels of the news that President Trump’s senior adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner may have attempted to set up a secure line of communication with the Kremlin, maybe having Julian Assange, of WikiLeaks fame, isn’t really the kind of backup that instills a sense of ease into the hearts and minds of politicos.

Sure, WikiLeaks posted thousands of hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee, as well as Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman, John Podesta.

Those leaked emails definitely damaged Clinton’s appeal with Bernie Sanders loyalists, highly miffed to find that the DNC was actively working against Sanders, in order to assure a Clinton nomination.

That suddenly made the file sharing outfit, along with founder, Assange, a righteous idol for Trump’s loyalists, including men like Sean Hannity.

Of course, the tune was completely different in 2010, when WikiLeaks poured out Afghan war documents and diplomatic cables that discussed how to stop Iran.

The damaging releases set patriots on edge, knowing our diplomatic efforts, our intelligence, and our troops were jeopardized.

The long-held belief is that Russia is behind those leaks, which makes Assange’s defense of Kushner now, all the more laughable.

Trump’s son-in-law reportedly spoke with the Russian ambassador to the U.S., Sergey Kislyak, in December about setting up a secret communications channel at Russian diplomatic facilities where U.S. intelligence officials would be unable to pick up the private discussions.

On at least three occasions during or after the presidential campaign, Kushner failed to disclose his communication with Kislyak.

Kushner’s lawyer has claimed that his client doesn’t remember the conversations with Kislyak.

Remember or not, you have to wonder if Assange’s tweet was meant to help, or to further stir the pot?