In what was a bipartisan effort, the Senate voted on a resolution Monday that called for President Trump to abide by a 1995 law that called for a move of the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem.

This, of course, was one of Trump’s campaign promises, but he recently signed a six-month waiver to keep the embassy in Tel Aviv, in order to allow for Jared Kushner to bring peace to the Middle East.

Yeah, I know how that sounds.

Yesterday’s vote may have been symbolic, at best, but it passed, 90 – 0.

Said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell:

“In honor of this significant anniversary for our close ally, many Senators from both sides of the aisle are joining together in a resolution to mark the occasion today,” McConnell said. “While we know that Israel continues to face a number of threats, bipartisan passage of this resolution will serve as yet another indication of the United States’ commitment to standing by our Israeli friends.”

The vote was part of a larger commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the reunification of Jerusalem, after what was called the Six Day War, in 1967.

The Six Day War began on June 5, 1967, as a response from Israel to Arab forces amassing at their borders.

Simultaneously battling forces from Egypt, Syria, and Jordan, Israel managed to more than double their size.

By June 11, Israel had captured the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula of Egypt, the Golan Heights of Syria, and the West Bank and Arab sector of East Jerusalem from Jordan.

The U.N. Security Council wanted all captured lands returned, but Israel refused. They claimed East Jerusalem as theirs and set up military installments. They did, however, agree to return all other territories, in exchange for a guarantee of no future attacks and recognition by the Arab nations of Israel’s right to exist.

In August of 1967, Arab leaders met and decided there would be no peace and no recognition of Israel’s right to exist.

In spite of all the talks of peace in the subsequent years, it would appear that they’ve maintained that particular stance.