Well, this is fun.

Over the weekend, an email imposter, posing as Steve Bannon, contacted a Breitbart Editor-in-Chief Alex Marlow and convinced him that A) he was talking to Steve Bannon, and B) got him to admit a willingness to do the “dirty work” against aides within the Trump administration.

The emails exchanges were given to CNN by the prankster.

In other emails, Marlow suggested he could have Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump ousted from the White House “by end of year” and shared a personal smear about their private lives, perhaps an indication of how low the website is willing to go to achieve its agenda.

This is not the first time the anonymous email prankster, who tweets under the name @SINON_REBORN and describes himself as a “lazy anarchist,” has pulled a stunt like this. In July, the person fooled top White House officials into thinking he was other officials, causing a stir in the West Wing. At the time, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the White House was “looking into” the incidents.

So apparently, this guy is good at what he does and he’s turned it into an art form.

Marlow couldn’t care less about being exposed, saying, “The obsession with Breitbart News is simply a result of our effectiveness. This time, an imposter deceitfully obtained and shared with CNN tongue-in-cheek emails that revealed that we feel Globalists present an existential threat to the agenda that got President Trump elected.” 

So, plans to go full-nasty are justified.

The prankster began:

“Reading online about how i’ll be bringing forth my wrath on Ivanka and Jared,” read an email sent Sunday from the fake Bannon account to Marlow. “I’d be doing this great nation a service if I did.”

“I spooked em today,” replied Marlow. “Did five stories on globalist takeover positioning you as only hope to stop it.”

“You need to own that, just have surrogates do the dirty work. Boyle, Raheem, me, Tony have been waiting for this,” Marlow added, referring to Washington editor Matthew Boyle, Breitbart London Editor-in-Chief Raheem Kassam, and reporter Tony Lee.

Later, Marlow shared what CNN describes as a “personal smear” against Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner’s private life. CNN chose not to repeat the rumor, so it’s probably pretty uncomfortable.

“Haha.. lovely stuff,” replied the fake Bannon account. “So do you think you’ll have them packed and shipping out before Christmas?”

“Let me see what I can do… hard to know given your description of them as evil,” Marlow replied. “I don’t know what motivates them. If they are semi normal, then yes, they out by end of year.”

Marlow added: “You saying no admin is more divided is more important thing you said all weekend… let’s talk about it in person.”

Breitbart’s senior editor-at-large, Joel Pollak, also fell victim.

“No one can figure out what [Ivanka Trump and Kushner] do,” Pollak wrote in an email to the fake Bannon account.

“Had a good chat with Alex,” the prankster replied, referring to Marlow. “Seems he’s already aligning the crosshairs and making me the masked puppeteer.”

“Excellent. I just tried calling,” Pollak wrote back. “Not sure if you have the same number. I’m at 847-XYZ-XXXX. Available anytime.”

The prankster went on to explain to CNN that he was inspired to carry out this practical joke after Bannon’s departure from his role as White House chief strategist, when it immediately became known that Breitbart was preparing to go to war with the same people Bannon had just called his colleagues.

After the Breitbart editors realized they had been hoodwinked, Breitbart president and CEO Larry Solov wrote a cautionary note to staffers.

“For the moment, be especially careful of emails from this address,” Solov wrote in the company’s internal Slack channel, a copy of which was obtained by CNN.

Solov added: “They are fake.”

Yes, they are, but they do offer a really revealing look into how Breitbart operates and what the Trump administration should be expecting.