This is the weekend of the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C.

In the past, the summit has boasted such speakers as Rick Perry, Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, Marco Rubio, Glenn Beck, Mark Levin, and even some guy named Erick Erickson.

The event has some pretty heavy hitting sponsorship, as well, with the primary sponsor being the FRC Action, which is the legislative arm of the Family Research Council.

Religious liberty, traditional marriage, and pro-life issues are the stated topics of concern, as the event tends to cater to the evangelical crowd. All in all, it has been an awesome forum for principled, faith-based conservatives to gather.

This year’s lineup is impressive, as well.

Lila Rose, the founder of the pro-life organization, LiveAction, Dana Loesch, Dr. Alveda King, and David Daleiden, project leader for Center for Medical Progress – the organization that blew the lid off the horrors of Planned Parenthood with their undercover videos about abortionists harvesting baby parts for profit – are among the speakers planned.

But then you see Sebastian Gorka and Steve Bannon on the list and you wonder if it’s a joke.

Nope. Not a joke. They were actually given a platform to speak at what is billed as a gathering for values voters.

Bannon, who has been described as a volatile, profane, hateful man by those who’ve worked for him seems woefully out of place in the lineup.

He spoke on Saturday, addressing a crowd that was there, presumably, to support the building up of people of faith in the political arena, and predictably, it didn’t really sound like what you would expect from Christians.

So what did the protector of the alt-right nationalists speak on?

Pro-life issues? Traditional marriage? Maybe just grace and self-control in a profane age?

Not quite.

“Right now it’s a season of war against the GOP establishment,” Bannon reportedly said at the Values Voter Summit, an annual conference of evangelical social conservatives, where Trump himself spoke on Friday.

Bannon also hit Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, saying he’s been getting calls to find “the Brutus” to his “Julis Caesar,” comparing the Kentucky lawmaker to the Roman emperor who was stabbed in the back by his trusted friend.

Kind of violent imagery for what is supposed to be a Christian event, but, whatever.

I heard bits of Bannon’s speech. None of it seemed in line with what the summit allegedly stands for.

Did I say Bannon was hateful and seemed out of place?

“Yeah, Mitch, the donors are not happy. They’ve all left ya. We’ve cut your oxygen off, Mitch, OK?” Bannon said Saturday.

I don’t know how the crowd responded, but from the clips of Bannon’s tirade I have heard, most of those fine, straight-laced believers seemed to be cheering him on, which is disappointing.

Senior writer with the National Review, David French, questioned the wisdom in giving the alt-right a forum in what is supposed to be an event for people of moral character.

Don’t be surprised if you never get answers to this.

Everything now is awful.