If you’re still clinging to those faraway hopes of, “Lock her up!” you should probably start focusing on a hobby, or something.

According to comments from South Carolina Rep. Trey Gowdy, it’s just not realistic.

To be more specific, those who want to play the tit-for-tat game and appoint a special counsel to investigate Hillary Clinton, the Clinton Foundation, and how the FBI handled the investigation into her private email server, Gowdy says there’s a threshold to be met, and to date, that just hasn’t happened.

Said Gowdy:

“I don’t think the threshold has been met for the appointment of special counsel,” Gowdy told Fox News on Wednesday. “I think this is a really important point. You can investigate something without special counsel.”

“In fact, 99.9 percent of all investigations in this country are done by the women and men at the Department of Justice and the U.S. Attorney’s Offices, and none of them is called special counsel,” Gowdy said. “So there is a threshold that has to be met, and I don’t think it has been met. To say we’re not going to appoint special counsel is not to say we’re not going to look into something.”

Gowdy’s comments put him opposite of some of his Republican colleagues, who have been pressing the Justice Department to just do an overall sweep of all things Clinton-related, and to appoint special counsel to cover those issues.

When questioned about it on Tuesday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions seemed to share a likeminded stance with Gowdy.

During a House Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday, Jordan pressed Attorney General Jeff Sessions on why a special counsel hasn’t yet been appointed when it “looks like” there has been wrongdoing.

“I would say ‘looks like’ is not enough basis to appoint a special counsel,” Sessions told Jordan before explaining the legal basis for naming one.

A letter was sent to the House Judiciary Committee, noting that Sessions had directed senior federal prosecutors to evaluate issues with the Clinton Foundation, Uranium One, and other Republican concerns, to determine if special counsel should be appointed.

Gowdy agrees that there should be investigation. It just may not be special counsel.

“The threshold is, is there a conflict of interest? And is it in the interest of justice to go pick someone who is not even part of the system right now to investigate something? I don’t think it’s been met yet,” he said.

Now let’s count all the ways that Gowdy’s character and job performance will be slammed, simply because he stated a legal opinion in conflict with emotional opinions.