After Tuesday night’s shellacking in Alabama, it seems the White House may be feeling a bit “stung.”

With that in mind, they may be moving a bit more cautiously on some of their picks for key appointments.

One Trump pick, in particular, would be Brett Talley, a Justice Department attorney, nominated to an Alabama federal judgeship by President Trump, even though he’s never even tried a case, before.

After some opposition from Senate Republicans, Talley offered to withdraw his nomination, and the White House is apparently accepting that.

Specifically, Senator Chuck Grassley urged Trump to reconsider several of his judicial nominees, with Talley being one of them.

Talley’s nomination was advanced by Republicans last month, but Grassley advised the White House to reconsider moving forward.

So what’s the problem with Talley?

Well, he’s just really inexperienced, for starters.

The 36-year-old Talley has practiced law for less than three years, and has never tried a case in court, leading to the American Bar Association’s unanimous “not qualified” rating, the fourth it has given to one of Trump’s judicial nominees.

And you can point to the American Bar Association and proclaim them unworthy, due to a partisan bent all you want, but that only proves your own partisan leanings, if you actually think someone who has only practiced law for a couple of years and never worked inside a court room should be fast tracked to a federal judgeship.

On his Senate paperwork, he left out that he was married to a White House lawyer, which some might see as just a bit too shady.

He also reportedly made controversial comments online about inmates on death row, writing, “Just shoot them. That’s effective.”

Not what anyone wants to hear from a judge.

Talley previously worked as a deputy assistant attorney general in the Justice Department’s legal office and as a deputy solicitor general for the state of Alabama. He was also part of the Tuscaloosa Paranormal Research Group and has written extensively about paranormal activities and other topics in the horror genre.

Um… that last part.

How Talley was even nominated remains a mystery, but let’s hope the next pick has the benefit of experience, minus the really nutty background baggage, and can be moved forward.