He’s not wrong.

As recently as this morning, I’ve seen the online rumors about professional wrestler-turned-actor Dwayne “the Rock” Johnson and his political ambitions.

In 2017, there was an attempt to “draft” Johnson into the political scene by a committee called “Run the Rock 2020.” They even formally filed with the Federal Election Committee. At the time, Johnson teased that there was a “possibility” that he would enter the world of politics.

While calling the interest in his running “flattering,” he suggested in a recent Rolling Stone interview that it may require a bit more than desire to get that ball rolling.

He cited 2016 as a lesson about the value of experience, when it comes to the serious field of politics.

 “What I’m sensing now is that we have to pivot back to people who have a deep-rooted knowledge of American history and politics and experience in policy and how laws get made. I think that pivot has to happen,” the “Rampage” star tells Rolling Stone in an interview published this week.

“I think in a lot of people’s minds, what Trump has proved is that anybody can run for president,” says the WWE wrestler-turned-box office star, who’s flirted over the years with his own political bid. “And in a lot of people’s minds, what he’s also proved is that not everybody should run for president.”

It’s kind of like skinny jeans.

Just because they make them in your size, that doesn’t mean you have to shoehorn your bulging, bouncy, buttocks in them.

That muffin top screaming for the sweet release of death is not cute.

Given all that Johnson has accomplished in his career, coupled with the swaggering confidence of his WWE persona, you’d expect him to be less introspect about a potential leap into a political career. Instead, he shows an astounding abundance of commonsense on the topic.

As to why efforts to rush him to some higher office may be a bit of putting the cart before the horse:

“I think it’s also a function of being very unsatisfied with our current president,” Johnson, a registered Independent, said of the “excitement” from the public.

“But this is a skill set that requires years and years of experience. On a local level, on a state level and then on a national level,” Johnson, 45, said. “I have the utmost respect for our country and that position, and I’m not delusioned in any way to think, ‘Oh, absolutely, if Trump can do it, I can do it, and I’ll see you in 20-whatever, get ready.’ Not at all.”

Not to sound cliché, but what a breath of fresh air!

Johnson goes on to say that, like many – myself included – he chose neither of the two liberals (or that one, stoned “Aleppo” dude) running for office. In fact, he abstained.

“At the time, I just felt like it was either vote for the [candidate] I thought would make a better president than the other, even though I would rather have someone else, or not vote at all.”

“I wrestled back and forth with it. We were on the set of ‘Jumanji’ in Hawaii, and it really was like calling on the gods. Give me the answer. Ultimately, it was [to not vote],” he said.

He added that that’s the last time he will remain silent, out of dissatisfaction with the choices. He intends to be more vocal by the time 2020 rolls around.

Oh, I smell ya, and I agree.