Is Rep. Renee Ellmers (R-NC) worthy of life? No, really, I see no reason why I shouldn’t expect an answer. Ellmers, and the others who conspired against a bill to restrict abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy that had 60% public support, should come out and justify her existence. Tell me why you are worthy of this life you have been given, Representative.

It might seem like an unreasonable request, I am sure that many will find it impolite. I highly doubt this post will win me any awards for congeniality, but that isn’t really my style. Not only is it not my style, every time I hold myself back in an attempt to get along with the reasonable republicans in the room, I die a little bit inside and inevitably I wonder why I am even doing this.

With that in mind, I don’t care if I offend you today. I don’t care if you think it is un-Christian, irresponsible, or just plain mean, that I demand to know whether Rep. Renee Ellmers (R-NC) is worthy of life. Not only will I not care, my conscience won’t be troubled in the least. My indignation is righteous, as is my cause.

My cause is life, and every time abortion – the legal and willful murder of a life in utero – becomes a topic of public debate in our nation it is the prolife side that is forced to justify a baby, blameless and innocent, being worthy of life. This in itself is horrible and disgusting, as well as a sad commentary on where we are as a culture, but does it justify me asking whether Representatives Ellmers and her pro-abort allies are worthy of life?

Honestly, I wouldn’t know. My situation is different. I am the product of one of life’s greatest evils, if society were as backwards and unevolved as to recognize such things. In the eyes of a secular society full of social engineers who clearly know better than me, I was never blameless and innocent. Within me there was a genetic curse. The potential damage I could inflict upon society is, was, and always will be, clear justification to have ended my life before it started.

You see, I am the product of rape. No, my biological father didn’t rape my mother. My mother’s biological father raped my grandmother. Had that not happened, I simply would not exist.

Because of this fact I am forced to justify not only my own existence, but the existence of my mother and brother, my niece and my own children. I have to positively affirm my life and the life of those around me for the simple fact that I am.

This isn’t the first time I have written about this part of my life. Previously I wrote about how I came to be aware of the fact I was a product of rape in 2012 during the Akin controversy. At the time I talked a bit about my mother and what she had done in her life. While it honestly is offensive to have to do this, I will quote from my previous post on the matter to once again justify the life of my mother:

My mother has been responsible for saving countless number of lives in her 30 year career as a nurse. She worked mid shifts in the Maricopa County Hospital Emergency Room. She worked in the NICU in the same hospital. She worked as a crew member nurse on a flight for life helicopter at various points in her career. Today she works as a hospice nurse comforting those waiting on the inevitable.

This woman, my mother, has dedicated her entire adult life to saving others. To my friend, she was a “bad seed” whose life should have been snuffed out before even beginning, all because her father was incapable of controlling the lust that lived within him.

I am sure my friend never even considered the possible lives that would be lost if my mother had been aborted. In fact, he couldn’t have because he didn’t know my mother was the product of a rape.

My mother is, was, and always will be worthy of life. Just like me and the many lives she saved. We are the fortunate ones who were given the chance to justify our worth through life. Part of that justification is fighting for those who do not yet have a voice, or choice, of their own.

It is repugnant that I even have to type these thoughts out. But when the pro aborts call me an extremist, when they say, “exceptions for rape”, I hear, “you are not worthy of life.” I feel compelled to justify myself and explain that it isn’t extreme to defend one’s own existence. As I asked on the March For Life edition of The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Friends last night:

“Why do we have to defend the idea that life itself is good?”

And let me be absolutely clear, it is all life we should be concerned with. It isn’t just the rapists spawn whom Ellmers and her fellow followers of Moloch wish to deny life. It is any child lucky enough to have made it 20 weeks into a pregnancy without the “mother” having already felt over burdened by it, as well.

In my view every single life, no matter the circumstances of his or her conception, should be protected by law. That said, I understand that our culture, any culture really, tends to move slowly on reform, saving its bursts of energy instead for loftier goal like “progress”, but that isn’t this case this time. This time the culture was there, ready to recognize life, plain and simple. Not only was the culture there, so was science.

The only people standing in the way were Renee Ellmers, her boys in the GOP leadership, and the followers of Moloch.

So why am I considered impolite when I ask Rep. Renee Ellmers (R-NC), Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA), Rep. John Boehner (R-OH), and the rest of the liars, cheats, and wimps to explain just why they are worthy of life?

I expect it has a lot to do with serious self reflection and discomfort that comes with the realization that their own justifications of worthiness may just fall flat. Much like I expect the GOP Leadership does without their Viagra.

Fortunately for Ellmers, her Congressional career is likely in its first trimester. Eliminating it would be no big deal whatsoever.