This is one of those things that is as amazing as it is funny. Photojournalist James Woods did a side-by-side comparison of Hillary and Bernie rallies from the day after Super Tuesday, and both the description and the photos are very telling. And awesome.

First, the pics. Here’s his tweet:

I’m sure you can guess which is which. But the descriptions have the most hilarious kicker of all:

In Michigan, Sanders spoke to a packed house at the Breslin Student Events Center at Michigan State University, where thousands of supporters lined up in the snow for hours to hear his energetic speech.

That would be the huge crowd you see on the left. Now read about Hillary’s:

Meanwhile, in New York City, Hillary Clinton had a very different kind of rally in a draped-off corner of the Jacob Javits Center. The rally was organized for and by many of the labor bosses in New York who had endorsed Clinton over the objections of their members. USA Today, covering the event, called it her “victory lap.”

For most of the attendees, being at the rally was mandatory, while some groups, such as the Carpenters Union, gave attendees “comp time” for the hours they were at the event. Even with such incentives, there were fewer than 1,000 people there.

Mandatory. AND EXTRA PAY. Bwa ha ha ha! Oh you crazy unions.

Hillary’s enthusiasm problem has been a constant worry. From young female voters who just don’t care about her being the first woman president to the total lack of any sort of inspirational or thematic element to her campaign or even her videos, she seems to be running on two things: the power of the Clinton machine, and the message that “hey, I’m not in jail YET!”

She’s staying ahead of Bernie for now (in fact she’s kicking his butt in delegates), but if she ends up facing a popular, non-insane Republican in the general election – like say, I don’t know, one who won Iowa, Texas, Alaska, and Oklahoma – it’s hard to imagine she will have the turnout to win. She hasn’t even got the turnout to fill an auditorium with people who are being paid to be there.