Well, since they can’t force people to bake the damn cake, at least they can force their will on other things, as LGBT activists turned their crosshairs from bakeries and pastries, to dating sites.

ChristianMingle.com is an online dating service centered around a clientele that is…well, Christian. The site holds to Christian beliefs that relationships should occur between a man and a woman. The choices reflect that by not giving you the option of seeking a male if you’re a male, or female if you are female.

This angered two gay men who attempted to use it, apparently, and they set out to make the Christian site include homosexual relationships as well.

Religious liberty lost in California, and the site will be making changes to its format to include homosexual relationships.

ChristianMingle.com is owned by Spark Networks Inc., which bases itself out of California. The state of California has something called the “Unruh Civil Rights Act” which essentially dictates that any business has to accommodate anyone at any time, even if it violates your religious beliefs.

“All persons within the jurisdiction of this state are free and equal, and no matter what their sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, or sexual orientation are entitled to the full and equal accommodations, advantages, facilities, privileges, or services in all business establishments of every kind whatsoever.”

Spark Networks is also host to other religious themed dating sites, including CatholicMingle.com, JDate.com, and others, and will be changing their formats to include homosexual relationships as well.

That’s not all. The two gay men who filed the suit will receive $9,000 a piece to help assuage their hurt feelings, and $450,000 to cover their attorney fees.

Why the gay men couldn’t find relationships on a site for gays, or maybe starting a site for Christian gays of their own, is beyond me. In fact, with a quick Google search, I found one right off the bat that helps Christian gays and lesbians find each other. Forcing religious sites to conform to formats outside of their religious beliefs was wholly unnecessary.

However, as we’ve experienced in the past with LGBT activism, leaving well enough alone isn’t the point. All must submit and conform. Christian bakers must bake the cake. Christian t-shirt makers must make the shirt. Christian websites must include homosexual relationships.

While I realize there are LGBT Christians out there, it ceases being Christianity when the activism comes before faith. A Christian business that holds Christian values should not be forced to ditch those values, and punished financially on top of that, just like an LGBT business shouldn’t be forced to provide products that go against its message.

And to my knowledge, no one has tried to force LGBT businesses to do anything, or at least succeeded.

Furthermore, I noticed only Christian businesses being targeted. The only person I’ve seen attempt to get Muslim bakeries to do anything was Steven Crowder, and he was just trying to prove a point.

We can all easily find a place that will provide the service we’re seeking, especially in this age of the internet. There’s no need to tread on each other’s rights and beliefs.