Image Credit: Albert H. Teich/Shutterstock.com

Image Credit: Albert H. Teich/Shutterstock.com

I watch Donald Trump attack those that go after him or candidates that get close to him in the polls and I wonder about the language he uses. How he calls them terrible, losers and worse. Consider how he called Ben Carson, a renown pediatric neurosurgeon, a mediocre doctor. Or his statements about Carly Fiorina’s appearance. Not to mention his more than inappropriate comments about Megyn Kelly that got him uninvited from the RedState Gathering. And why does he speak to voters at a fourth grade level? After all, Trump has an Ivy League education and is a very successful world class businessman.

So I was intrigued last week when I heard him say that as president he would have a different tone. He said that in response to a question during the press gaggle he conducted on board his 757 aircraft. that exchange occurs at about the 14:35 mark of this YouTube video:

“Reporter: Would use language like that, calling people a loser if you were president?

Trump: No. It would be a different tone.”

When the Washington Examiner published an article titled, “Trump pledges personality change as president,” It got my attention. During his appearance on today’s edition of CBS’ “Face the Nation” Sunday, Trump said that as president, he would not talk as much, be less combative and a cheerleader for the United States, and continue to not be politically correct. The interesting exchange about how President Trump would be different than presidential candidate Trump begins at about the 4:48 mark of the interview with John Dickerson.

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Trump tells Dickerson that he would be a “much different person” as president. When Dickerson asks if Trump’s supporters were right when a few of them said that if Trump gets to be president he will have people to coach him and brush off the rough edges of the things he says, Trump denies having rough edges:

“I don’t think I have any rough edges. I’ll be honest with you. I went to an Ivy League school. I was a good student. I went to the Wharton School of Finance … And I can be more politically correct than any coach they can get me. I can be the most politically correct person with you.”

After an exchange during which Dickerson tries in vain to get Trump to say something politically correct, he asks Trump if there isn’t a cost for Trump’s political incorrectness:
“Dickerson: Isn’t there a cost? Think of all the names they call you because of the things you said.
Trump: Well think of the fact that I’m leading in the polls by tremendous margins. I think that’s part of it too. People don’t want Political correctness. They are tired of it. And I think that’s one the things that resonates with me. I don’t go out of my way to be politically incorrect.”
So there you have it. What you see with presidential candidate Trump is not what you would get with a President Trump.