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On Thursday Sen. Ted Cruz launched, and then pulled, an ad hitting Sen. Marco Rubio for his Gang of Eight immigration reform work with Chuck Schumer and company because one of the actresses had appeared in pornographic films. Cruz campaign spokesman Rick Tyler said the actress had responded to an open casting call for the ad and "Unfortunately, she was not vetted by the production company. Had the campaign known of her full filmography, we obviously would not have let her appear in the ad."

According to Fox News, the actress in question, Amy Lindsay, appeared in several movies with titles like "Carnal Wishes" and "Insatiable Desire." She is also listed as having appeared in the TV series "Star Trek: Voyager" and the 1996 film adaptation of Henry James' novel "The Portrait of a Lady." Lindsay let it be known she wasn't happy the ad was pulled in a tweet:

Extremely disappointed the #TedCruz campaign pulled the national television spot I had a role in... #moretocome #myvotecounts
— Amy Lindsay (@amylindsayLA) February 12, 2016

The TV ad, "Conservatives Anonymous," was to be part of series of Cruz ads and website to focus on how Conservatives have been betrayed by their elected officials in Washington, D.C. who fail to keep their promises to fight for Conservative principles. The ad, as described by the New York Times goes like this:

Seven actors playing members of a support group sit on folding chairs in a dimly lighted gymnasium or social hall, over the quietly chirpy sounds of syncopated strings and xylophone. “Has anyone else here struggled with being lied to?” the moderator asks, as the other men and women shift in their seats and look at the floor.

A white man with a shaved head, wearing a red flannel shirt, speaks up. “Well, I voted for a guy who was a Tea Party hero on the campaign trail, and then he went to D.C. and played patty-cake with Chuck Schumer and cut a deal on amnesty.” The moderator frowns, says “Mmm,” and asks if that made him angry. The rueful voter says no, “It makes me feel dumb for trusting him.”

A woman suggests, “Maybe you should vote for more than just a pretty face next time,” as the moderator consoles the voter with an empathetic shoulder squeeze. The voter, and the group, nod as one.

At that, we hear a door opening, and a haggard-looking man in a wrinkled Marco Rubio campaign T-shirt abruptly appears. “You guys have room for one more?” he asks, and the group eagerly welcomes him.

You can still watch the ad courtesy of the John Kasich endorsing New York Times. The paper has embedded it as a Times video obviously seeing it as a way to take a shot at both Cruz and Rubio.

The ad was not effective enough and tried to be way too cute with the "just a pretty face" line. The ad didn't go over well with Rubio supporters on social media and might have been counterproductive. Perhaps that had something to do with the ad being pulled.