There has been a lot of commentary in the media in the last few days, as there always is when bad things happen at the hands of Islamic terrorists, that the beliefs of the Islamic terrorists are not in the Koran.

These typically follow with quotes from the Koran and the usually white, urban, liberal explaining at the terrorist is just misreading that passage.

I cannot help but notice that these are usually the exact same people who also often write that evangelicals are misreading the Bible on the divinity of Jesus, the exclusivity of the path through him to salvation, gay marriage, the sanctity of life, and how ridiculous it is to believe there was a global, world-wide flood.

It suddenly dawned on me this week that I'm falling victim to the Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect.

Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray’s case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward—reversing cause and effect. I call these the “wet streets cause rain” stories. Paper’s full of them.

In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know.

In other words, in the same way I would not listen to what a liberal atheist on the op-ed page of the New York Times thinks about my religion, why the hell should I listen to them about Islam?

I should not. And neither should you.