Back when President Obama announced his executive order granting amnesty to potentially millions of illegal aliens, there was a lot of speculation on just how well such an action would hold up in court. Thus far, for the administration, the results have been nothing but rejection. The latest in the series of judicial setbacks for the President came last week when a three judge panel for the 5th Circuit Court in New Orleans upheld the decision by a federal judge to block the plan in February. Now, we know the next date to focus on. From the Hill:

A federal appeals court said Wednesday it has set a date to hear an expedited appeal of a lower court order that put President Obama’s deportation relief programs on hold.

The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals will hear oral arguments on July 10 in New Orleans in the Obama administration’s attempt to lift a preliminary injunction from U.S. District Judge Andrew Hanen of Texas, which blocked several executive actions from taking effect.

As the article also notes, we will not know which judges will preside at the hearing. That will be announced a week prior to it.

The good news for us is that the courts thus far have been consistent in rejecting Obama's illegal executive amnesty. While there's always a chance that the judges selected for this hearing could rule in favor of the administration, the past rulings give us reason to hope that sanity will preside. Of course, we also thought that Obamacare looked dead at the Supreme Court before Chief Justice Roberts sold us out.

It's also worth reminding everyone that we have to depend on the courts to overturn the President's illegal executive amnesty because [mc_name name='Rep. John Boehner (R-OH)' chamber='house' mcid='B000589' ] surprised no one by caving and funding the amnesty this past March. The courts have been on our side up until now, but relying on them alone is not a position we should have had to be in.

Regardless of the news that the administration won't take the Appeals Court's current decision to the Supreme Court, we know that's where this case will end up. The administration only said that they would not take the present decision there, after all. Given the Chief Justice's wobbliness in the past, we should absolutely be concerned about that, but the results thus far have been promising. As I said before, let's hope sanity reigns in this case.