If you haven’t yet realized that the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) are fringe lunatics that care less about animals than they do about their own absurdist publicity stunts, this should convince you. PETA is suing David Slater, the photographer responsible for the viral “monkey selfie” photo that swept the internet a few years ago.

They’re suing him for copyright infringement on behalf of the monkey. Their stupid stunt has left the photographer broke because of the legal fees.

But British photographer David Slater, who is at the centre of a bizarre court battle of the now infamous “monkey selfie”, has revealed that being sued by a monkey has ruined his life and left him completely broke.

The 52-year-old from south Wales, who specialises in wildlife and conservation photography, said he has been left penniless after years of legal wrangling over whether he or the macaque owns the copyright of the picture.

PETA’s statement in response to media coverage is more proof that they are just a cult with little to no real world concern for the welfare of animals.

PETA is pleased with the robust discussion of this historic case, in which it is undisputed—even by the defendants—that the macaque Naruto made the cause-and-effect connection between pressing the shutter button and the change to his reflection in the camera lens, resulting in his now-famous selfie photographs. Copyright law is clear that under these circumstances, he should own the photos—and PETA is proud to be his voice in court. The proceeds from the use of these photos should go to protect Naruto and his family who are being wiped out for illegal bush meat and whose homelands are being destroyed by human encroachment. As we learn more about these highly intelligent, complex primates, who have their own culture and their own language and want only to be left alone and in peace, PETA believes that society has a moral imperative to advance and amend the law to recognize animals’ rights.

The endangered status of these monkeys is for PETA only a vehicle for pushing their absurd notion that animals and humans are entitled to the same rights. Theirs is not really a pro-animal position so much as a anti-human one.

Slater’s photo has actually helped improve conditions for the crested black macaque in Indonesia.

In spite of everything, Mr Slater said he does not regret taking the picture of the monkey. On the contrary, he said he is “absolutely delighted”.

“It has taken six years for my original intention to come true which was to highlight the plight of the monkeys and bring it to the world,” he said.

“No one had heard of these monkeys six years ago, they were down to the last thousands.”

He said that thanks to the publicity that his “monkey selfie” attracted, impoverished locals no longer shoot or eat macaques because “The locals used to roast them, but now they love them, they call it the ‘selfie monkey’,” he said.

“Tourists are now visiting and people see there is a longer-term benefit to the community than just shooting a monkey.”

Slater’s work helped make it economically beneficial to protect the macaques as a natural resource. Even though this helps protect them as a species it’s not good enough for PETA because their goal is establishing an insane moral philosophy. Animals and people are both expendable in that quest.