Democrats are still apoplectic at the idea that Donald Trump is about to officially become the next in line to lead the United States of America. They have been doing everything they can to dissuade the Electoral College from doing formally electing the man who won the 2016 presidential election, and it does not seem to be getting through.

They use two different ideas to try to convince anyone and everyone that Donald Trump’s election is illegitimate. The first is the claim that Hillary Clinton won the popular vote and should therefore really be the winner. The second is that Donald Trump is clearly ineligible to be president because he does not have the characteristics necessary to be president (temperament, moral guidance, basic human decency, etc.).

Now, while both of these facts can be argued as true, it doesn’t make a bit of difference when you take into consideration the one big, yet entirely disregarded data point that gives the Republicans the clear victory in the election: They killed it down the ticket.

It would be one thing if Donald Trump won. But it wasn’t just him. It was the entire Republican Party. I don’t use the term “mandate” when it comes to elections, but if I did, I would say this is about as clear a mandate as you could get.

  • Republicans, despite all odds, kept the Senate with a 52-48 majority. Despite all the polling, which panicked many Republicans going into that fateful Tuesday, the Republican Party set itself up to keep and even extend their majority over the next 2-4 years.
  • Republicans kept the House with a decisive 241-194 majority. They lost a net total of six seats, but competed well in races they should not have.
  • Republicans now have 32 state legislatures and 33 governor’s mansions, marking this as one of the most dominant Republican eras in American history.

If Hillary Clinton were the real winner based on the fact that she got more votes, wouldn’t that have given Republicans more losses? It is true that the Republicans lost six a net six House seats and two Senate seats, but the gains at the state level more than make up for it. Republicans have been largely running up the score in three of the last four major election cycles.

Clinton, therefore, cannot be considered to be the right and proper winner because she was representative of her entire party, having been nominated by her party, and her party lost. She lost the states she was expected to lose and then lost several of the states she was supposed to hold on to with ease. A person who loses that much, and whose party loses that much, can in no way be considered victorious.

This is all just nonsensical whining from a bunch of sore losers desperate for any chance to claim some sort of victory in an election when they had anything but. To quote the president-elect: Sad!