Hillary's inevitability heading into Iowa is anything but assured, as younger voters, enthusiastic about a "political revolution", overwhelmingly support Bernie Sanders.

Some recent polls have shown Sanders in the lead, some newer ones give Hillary the advantage, and others indicate a tie. Regardless, I'm sure Hillary, and her team, assumed a 2016 run would result in a comfortable margin between her and other Democratic challengers. But this election cycle has been a surprise in many ways, on both sides of the aisle.

On the Democratic side, however, Bernie's draw has resulted in support from those expected to be Clinton cheerleaders. It's not so much the scandal-ridden, FBI investigated, Democratic frontrunner's baggage that's pushing them to Bernie, though. It's the superficial fluff that goes along with the self-proclaimed Socialist Sanders, and how he makes voters feel.

Robert Reich, Secretary of Labor in the first (and hopefully only) Clinton administration, might be someone you'd expect to be a lock for Hillary. But Reich is a solid, and quite vocal, supporter of Bernie Sanders. In a blog post this week, Reich explained why Sanders is his choice:

Bernie Sanders is the most qualified candidate to create the political system we should have, because he’s leading a political movement for change.

Sounds eerily similar to the substance-free "hope and change" we've heard for a while, because it is. According to Reich, Bernie is...

...a political activist who tells it like it is, who has lived by his convictions for fifty years, who won’t take a dime of money from big corporations or Wall Street or the very rich, and who is leading a grass-roots “political revolution” to regain control over our democracy and economy.

Sanders, a long-time member of Congress, is a Socialist. A political, hipster-fueled revolution to control our democracy and economy would be just as bad as a Hillary Clinton presidency. Even in Reich's new video, "6 Responses to Bernie Sanders Skeptics", the focus is on what's fair. Reich attempts to refute people's issues with Bernie's Socialism, by saying America's greatest and most loved programs are our social welfare ones. (Unfortunately, in this entitlement society, that's true.) He refutes skeptics' issues with Bernie's support of single-payer healthcare, by saying even with higher taxes, Americans would come out ahead since there would be less money spent on advertising, executive pay, or billing. He glowingly shares support for Bernie's college-for-everyone plan, because it's just not fair that some can't afford college. Lastly, he cheers on Bernie's age, says 70s are the new 60s, and that good values are more important than how old you are. This comes from the side who thought old and white McCain was too elderly to become president.

Also in the camp for Bernie is one of Hollywood's most liberal celebrities (is there any other kind?). Susan Sarandon has been quite outspoken in her love of Sanders, much to the chagrin of Democrats, which is hilarious. Page Six reported that Sarandon is displeased with Hillary because of her vote for the Iraq war, and "because it’s 'patronizing to women to think that we all follow our genitalia to pick candidates'. Again, hilarious. When I say the same thing about voting based on gender to liberal women, I'm told I hate my own kind and questioned for not wanting to make history! For liberals, though, it's all about feelings, not about common sense. And those feelings push those like Sarandon, who previously supported, uh, winners like Al Gore and Ralph Nader, to Bernie instead.

Just last night in Iowa, Sanders preached about his economic ideas and so-called "society of fairness", whatever that means. As USA Today reported:

"It doesn't mean to say everybody has the same income, everybody has the same kind of house, drives the same kind of car," he said. "But what it does mean is that we're a society based on justice, based on equality, based on fairness."

Like I said, whatever that means. The ambiguous nature of "fair" is much like the Obama era message of "hope and change". It sounds good, and feels good, but what it really means is higher taxes, entitlements, and messages of inclusion-at-any-cost rather than hard work and determination.

This is why Bernie is almost neck-and-neck with Hillary right before Iowa. And while "fairness" sells, it comes at a very steep price.