John Kasich virtually conceded every single Super Tuesday state, which is, shall we say, a little unorthodox in terms of a strategy to actually win the Republican nomination. In fact, he almost skipped South Carolina, preferring instead to spend significant amounts of time the week after his surprise second place New Hampshire finish in… Michigan.

Well, to be fair, he didn’t entirely skip Super Tuesday – he tried to do well in Massachusetts and for his efforts he finished about 5 votes ahead of Marco Rubio, who ignored the state. He finished over 30% behind Trump, however.

Doing surprisingly well in Michigan next Tuesday has always been a central linchpin of Kasich’s strategy. He has hoped to get a second place finish in Michigan, which would somehow catapult him into a first place finish in Ohio. So while the other candidates in the race have been traversing the South looking for votes, Kasich has been trying to make Midwesterners feel like they are the special focus of his awe-inspiring gaze. Well, let’s take a second to examine how that’s been working out?

EAST LANSING, Michigan — Donald Trump (39%) continues to lead Florida U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (19%), Texas U.S. Senator Ted Cruz (14%), Ohio Governor John Kasich (12%), and Dr. Ben Carson (9%) while 2% are for someone else and 7% are undecided according to the latest Mitchell/FOX 2 Detroit – Michigan Poll conducted last night before results of the Super Tuesday Caucuses were known.

If you are keeping score, what this means is that Kasich is dead last among candidates who are still in the race.

Dead. Last.

Which, incidentally, is exactly the same place he finished in good old Midwestern Oklahoma. And pretty much where he finished in Midwestern Iowa.

But hey, don’t worry, I’m sure there are a lot of New England states left on the map where Kasich can score a lot of distant second place finishes and really rack up his delegate count. Oh wait, there aren’t? Well, look, he’s from Ohio, you know, so he still has a chance.