Actor Johnny Depp took to the microphone at the Glastonbury Music Festival on Thursday to lambast President Donald Trump.

Depp responded to the crowd saying, “Can we bring him here? He needs help.”

All of this seems rather innocuous and simply like another left-wing actor spouting off…until Depp decided to make an incendiary reference about Abraham Lincoln’s assassination saying, “When was the last time an actor assassinated a president?”

He then went on to deflect the implication of his statement with the cop-out of, “I’m not an actor. I lie for a living.”

Once again we are met with jokes about assassinating a sitting president as being suggestible and even ostensibly fine and dandy with a certain portion of the public. Depp is still an American citizen, after all. And of the four assassinated U.S. presidents, three have been Republicans.

These kinds of jokes wouldn’t have been funny seven months ago, and despite how anyone feels about what Trump is doing to America, they’re still not funny.

Of course, incendiary political language has been the fabric of American discourse since its inception. Burning leaders in effigy is something Americans and other Western nations have long held as an integral part of freedom of speech.

While Depp’s comments were cold and inflammatory, he had every right to say them…and we have a right to call out his nonsense.