President Trump met with Evangelical leaders on Wednesday, as all presidents have been wont to do from time to time. As one would expect, the faith leaders spent time praying over the leader of the country and one happened to take a picture of the moment and shared it on Twitter.

Setting aside the fact that taking a photo during a time of prayer smacks of unadulterated irreverence and should not have been done, some immediately jumped into “separation of church and state” mode.

The anti-religion crowd has now cleared the bar from not wanting prayer in schools all the way down to, “we don’t want public officials praying or being prayed for at all.”

Fun times.

I have a feeling that if Thomas Jefferson knew the havoc writing one letter would have on religious freedom in America, he might have just let the Danbury Baptist congregation’s concerns go unaddressed.

Of course, you’ll never convince the “separation of church and state” crowd that they’re impeding on others rights to engage in religious practices, which was precisely the point Jefferson was making in the letter that is used as the impetus for the doctrine.

Their right to freedom from religion – hearing it, seeing it, reading about it – which does not exist in the U.S. Constitution now trumps what is there, the right of every individual to practice their religion.