mcclainI haven’t devoted any time to the Ray Rice affair because celebrity spousal abuse doesn’t interest me. What is interesting is this story and how it might affect the presidential ambitions of Chris Christie.

When Ray Rice was videotaped dragging his unconscious wife from an elevator in an Atlantic City, NJ, casino, Prosecutor Jim McClain recommended Rice be placed in a program for first time offenders, essentially taking no action, and this decision was approved by Superior Court Judge Michael Donio. Obviously, this is a sweetheart deal brought on by Rice’s celebrity because typically beating a woman, even your wife, unconscious is not acceptable… even in Atlantic City. In most jurisdictions it would be a felony but New Jersey might be different because of their peculiar culture.

But carry a legally registered firearm into the Garden State? You’d better bring your toothbrush with you.

Meanwhile, McClain is working to put 27-year-old mother of two Shaneen Allen — herself a first-time offender — into jail for at least three years, maybe even a decade.

Allen didn’t punch anyone out in an elevator. She simply didn’t know that her Pennsylvania concealed-carry permit was not valid in New Jersey.

In October 2013, Allen was pulled over for a minor traffic offense. She dutifully informed the officer of her gun and presented her concealed-carry permit. She was arrested.

Allen had a gun because she had been robbed twice in 2013 and feared for her children. Following her arrest, and McClain’s insistence that she face the maximum possible penalty for her oversight, Allen reportedly lost her job.

Judge Donio is also tied to the Allen case. He accepted McClain’s decision to deny Allen entry into the same pre-trial program Rice was allowed to enter.

That’s right. The same clowns that though it was fine to beat a woman unconscious worked together to throw a single mother in prison for accidentally bringing a firearm that was legally registered in Pennsylvania into dystopic Atlantic County, NJ. A technical crime McClain had ample authority to either not prosecute or dispose of by something much less than a felony prosecution.

One hardly knows what to make of this other than rank misogyny with a hint of racism thrown in for good measure. The common thread in both cases is that the lives and welfare of black women were treated as unimportant. In the one case because her husband was rich and famous and in the other because she was seen as a nobody.

What does this have to do with Chris Christie? New Jersey prosecutors are political appointments. McClain was put in his position by Christie.

The question that Christie has to answer now is whether this egregious maladministration of justice is his vision for how laws are enforced in New Jersey and if not, why his handpicked prosecutor is allowed to operate in this manner.