Bobby_Jindal_CPAC_2013

Great insight from Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal:

BATON ROUGE – Following a story in the New York Times today reporting that President Barack Obama is said to be showing “deepening frustration” and “anger” behind closed doors because of his administration’s lackluster response to the Ebola crisis, Governor Bobby Jindal declared that “we’ve reached the 'I’m so mad' stage of the President’s crisis management plan."

Governor Jindal said, “We have reached the ‘I’m so mad’ stage of the President’s crisis management plan. There are four stages of the President’s crisis management plan. Stage one: I got this. Stage two: I’m so mad. Stage three: More money will fix the problem. Finally, stage four: Republicans are obstructing.

“We’ve seen this process play out time and time again. The opposite approach is to start leading from the beginning of a crisis and not pass the buck. Now, we have an Ebola czar after the President’s own staff recognized the leadership void. The reality is that when there’s a crisis, you don't need a czar, you need a President who will take charge.”

He is exactly right. The Wall Street Journal has documented how Obama routinely gets mad when his administration screws the pooch (a near daily occurrence) but only after the news of the screw up makes it into the media.

On Nov. 14, 2012, Mr. Obama didn’t have to declare his anger when defending Susan Ricethen the United Nations ambassador and now the national security adviser, from attacks against her by Sens. John McCain (R., Ariz.) and Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.) over her statements about the Benghazi attack.

“If Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), and others want to go after somebody? They should go after me,” Mr. Obama said during a White House press conference. “And I’m happy to have that discussion with them. But for them to go after the U.N. ambassador who had nothing to do with Benghazi? And was simply making a presentation based on intelligence that she had received? And to besmirch her reputation is outrageous.”

And after his gun-control efforts died in the Senate in April 2013, Mr. Obama lashed out at the nation’s gun lobby and called the vote “a pretty shameful day” for Washington.

A few other instances of Mr. Obama publicly expressing his anger:

Feb. 27, 2014During remarks for his My Brothers Keeper initiative, Mr. Obama spoke of being angry growing up because he didn’t have his father around.

“I didn’t have a dad in the house,” he said. “And I was angry about it, even though I didn’t necessarily realize it at the time. I made bad choices.”

April 15, 2012: After the Secret Service prostitution scandal in Colombia, Mr. Obamaoffered conditional anger.

“If it turns out that some of the allegations that have been made in the press are confirmed, then of course I’ll be angry,” he said at a press conference.

May 27, 2010: Mr. Obama said he was upset about watching the BP BP.LN +2.02% oil spill.

“And I know that doesn’t lessen the enormous sense of anger and frustration felt by people on the Gulf and so many Americans. Every day I see this leak continue I am angry and frustrated as well.”

March 18, 2009: When executives at AIG, which was in the process of being bailed out by the federal government, were to be awarded million-dollar bonuses, Mr. Obama said there was no need to tamp down public outrage.

“I don’t want to quell anger,” he said. “I think people are right to be angry. I’m angry.”

Update: In an interview that aired Sunday, Chief of Staff Denis McDonough said Mr. Obama is “madder than hell” about the problems facing the Department of Veterans Affairs. “Nobody is more outraged about this problem right now” than the president, he said.

If Obama has accomplished a single thing in his presidency (other than trashing out economy and foreign policy) he has raised the bar of presidential incompetence to the point that Jimmy Carter looks like George Washington by comparison.