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Back in August 1992, Secretary of Labor Lynn Martin gave one of the nominating speeches on behalf of George H. W. Bush. It was the typical dross one hears at a convention save one prescient line:

“You cannot be one kind of man and another kind of president.”

The point was very simple and very telling. Democrats were telling us that Bill Clinton’s sexual escapades and Hillary Clinton’s grifting were private failings and that those failings had no bearing whatsoever on how they would act once ensconced in the White House. Martin’s point was that character is character. And she was proven correct, in spades. Under the Clintons the White House became a device for grubbing money from all sources. Pardons were sold. Enemies invented and punished. Female staff were used as party favors. The grifting Rodham clan virtually moved their double-wide onto the South Lawn.

“You cannot be one kind of man and another kind of president.”

And we are now at that juncture again. A point where the GOP seems poised to nominate a man to be president who actually favors those things many of us have spent our political lives agitating against. Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse had tweeted out a number of questions for Trump, who has studiously ignored them. You really should read them all. To me, though, the linchpin is Sasse’s question number four.


Trump has been typically braggadocious about his adultery and philandering. For instance, these come from his various literary works:

“If I told the real stories of my experiences with women, often seemingly very happily married and important women, this book would be a guaranteed best-seller (which it will be anyway!). I’d love to tell all, using names and places, but I just don’t think it’s right.” (“Trump: The Art of the Comeback”)


“I have too much respect for women in general, but if I did [write about my love life], the world would take serious notice. Beautiful, famous, successful, married — I’ve had them all, secretly, the world’s biggest names…”

If you are a supporter of Trump (let me say here, that even as I write this, if Trump is the nominee I will crawl over broken glass to vote to keep Hillary Clinton the hell out of the White House) at some point you have to ask yourself if Trump views a sacred vow like marriage, the epitome of the really big deal, as a minor impediment to him if he wants another man’s wife, then what chance do you have in dealing with him?

At his core, Trump is a very bad man. Not “bad man” in terms of being a criminal, but a bad man, a man devoid of manly virtues. And he is a corrupter who has learned to use his wealth to corrupt anyone who opposes him. How else to explain a self-admitted serial adulterer who has never seen reason to ask God for forgiveness being held up as a paragon of Christian living by the head of a religious university:

Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. defended Donald Trump’s remarks at convocation Monday morning, telling Fox News that Christians should be more concerned about the candidate’s personal character than his Biblical expertise.

“He may not be a theological expert and he might say two Corinthians instead of second Corinthians, but when you look at the fruits of his life and all the people he’s provided jobs, I think that’s the true test of somebody’s Christianity not whether or not they use the right theological terms,” Falwell told Sean Hannity Monday night.

Seriously? You look at the fruits of Trump’s life and you see a witness for Christianity? The abuse of illegal workers on his construction projects? Using the force of government to take a widow’s house? The sham bankruptcies that ruined small vendors? The massive debt owed to every bank on the North American continent? The casual slander of people who disagree with him? His sucking up to racists? The support of partial birth abortion? The using of women as sexual objects? The prideful adulteries?

When you add this to his policy preferences and his admiration for Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid, and Chuck Schumer you have a very ugly picture.

“You cannot be one kind of man and another kind of president.”