This could be important.

Ten days before Donald Trump was to officially take office as president, his choice for national security adviser, Michael Flynn, made a decision in the fight against ISIS.

According to an article on McClatchydc.com, Flynn was approached by exiting President Obama and his national security adviser Susan Rice. Obama and Rice had signed off on a Pentagon plan to recapture Raqqa, with the help of Syrian Kurdish forces.

Because of the timing, the plan wouldn’t kick into effect until after Trump had taken office, hence the reason Obama and Rice shared the plan with Flynn.

Flynn didn’t hesitate. According to timelines distributed by members of Congress in the weeks since, Flynn told Rice to hold off, a move that would delay the military operation for months.

If Flynn explained his answer, that’s not recorded, and it’s not known whether he consulted anyone else on the transition team before rendering his verdict. But his position was consistent with the wishes of Turkey, which had long opposed the United States partnering with the Kurdish forces – and which was his undeclared client.

It was only after Flynn was forced to step down from his role as national security adviser that the plan was eventually approved.

Since Flynn’s ouster, he has declared as a foreign agent on behalf of Turkey, and it was revealed that he’d been paid $500,000 to be their mouthpiece in Washington.

With word that the president may have asked FBI Director James Comey to drop any criminal probe of Flynn – failure to register as a foreign agent is a federal crime – there is renewed focus on getting to the bottom of what Flynn did, and what Trump knew.

Despite the Trump administration’s attempts to downplay the red flags, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the administration was repeatedly warned about Flynn’s foreign involvement.

Recent reports are that Trump has not quite gotten over the loss of Flynn. The man who filled Flynn’s role as national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, has excellent credentials, but a recent New York Times report stated that he “annoys” Trump, by trying to insert caveats when Trump is speaking with foreign leaders, and also tries to intervene and gently steer Trump back on topic.

Flynn also danced a little too close to Moscow.

Flynn’s connections to Russia have been widely discussed. In 2015, he was paid more than $33,000 to speak at a gala dinner in Moscow where he was seated next to President Vladimir Putin. That alone may have exposed him to criminal charges: As a retired U.S. military officer, Flynn was required to seek permission to travel and to receive payment from a foreign entity, something the State Department and the Pentagon have told Congress he did not do.

That opened up the gate to speculation that Russia had a foot in the door with the Trump administration, and Flynn is one of several Trump associates subjected to scrutiny because of suspected entanglements with the Russian government.