If he’s not a part of the administration, how does he benefit from campaign funds?

That would be my first question.

It would seem the Trump team knew that trouble was ahead with the unveiling of Donald Trump Jr’s meeting with a Kremlin-connected lawyer in Trump Tower a year ago.

Trump’s re-election campaign have paid out $50,000 to a law firm representing the younger Trump, according to the FEC.

The $50,000 was paid to the firm of Alan Futerfas on June 27, several days after Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner amended his security clearance form to reflect the previously undisclosed 2016 meeting he, Trump Jr., and then-Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort had with Russian attorney Natalia Veselnitskyaya.

The meeting would not become public knowledge for nearly another two weeks.

The timeline runs this track:

June 21st, Jared Kushner turns in his amended security clearance paperwork to the FBI, listing the meeting with the Russian lawyer at Trump Tower.

On June 23rd, Kushner meets with the FBI for his security clearance interview.

Approximately two weeks later, the New York Times broke the story about the June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower.

So is it legal for Trump’s campaign to pay his son’s legal fees?

If it’s a campaign-related expense, sure.

I’d say this one was arguable.

The Trump campaign’s FEC filing also shows payments to other companies for “legal consulting” since April. The bulk of the more than $600,000 went to the law firm of Jones Day.

Donald Trump – making lawyers rich again.