This is excellent news, actually.

A federal judge has ordered the State Department to resume the search for Hillary Clinton’s emails and other documents, as they relate to the death of U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans in Benghazi, Libya in 2012.

The judge, D.C. District Court Judge Amit Mehta has ruled that the State Department has not fulfilled its obligation to thoroughly search for everything related to what happened in Benghazi on the night of the attack.

We expected that during the Obama administration. The hope is that with a Republican administration the investigation will be taken more seriously.

From The Hill:

“The court finds that State’s search was inadequate insofar as it did not search the official state.gov e- mail accounts of Secretary Clinton’s three aides, and orders State to conduct a supplemental search of those accounts,” according to the ruling.

The aides include Huma Abedin, former Deputy Chief of Staff; Cheryl Mills, former Chief of Staff; and Jacob Sullivan, former Director of Policy Planning.

The judge said while the State Department likely won’t be able to “adequately” produce emails sent from Clinton’s private email server while she served at the time as secretary of state, the agency “has an obligation to search its own server for responsive records.”

And we know they won’t be getting their hands on Clinton’s servers. What she didn’t destroy before the last round of investigations, she’s very likely disposed of, now.

Judge Mehta doubts they’ll find much of anything else, but Judicial Watch, the organization that filed the initial Freedom of Information Act request, are calling the ruling a victory.

“This major court ruling may finally result in more answers about the Benghazi scandal — and Hillary Clinton’s involvement in it — as we approach the attack’s fifth anniversary,” Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton said in a statement Thursday.

The group’s fight began in March 2015, then they filed suit two months later against the State Department, after their FOIA request was ignored.

“It is remarkable that we had to battle both the Obama and Trump administrations to break through the State Department’s Benghazi stonewall,” Fitton said in his statement.

Remarkable, indeed.

The State Department has until September 22 to act on the court’s ruling and update them on the particulars of this additional search.