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Yesterday was yet another “Super” Tuesday and, as usual, RedState has everything you need to know about the rumble (and crumble) in the North East. States that voted yesterday were Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. They performed as expected, which is to say poorly. The same two April Fools who won in New York walked away winners again last night, as predicted.

Here we go with our projections.


Connecticut: Donald Trump won Connecticut with 58% of the vote, with Gov. John Kasich coming in second at 28.5% and Sen. Ted Cruz in last with 11.7% of the vote. Approximately 212,000 votes were cast.

Connecticut awards 10 delegates as winner-take-all if the winner has over 50% of the vote. The remainder of the delegates are winner take all by congressional district, and course, the three RNC delegates. As a result, all 28 delegates go to Donald Trump, meaning of course zero for anyone else.


Delaware: Donald Trump won with 60.8% of the vote, followed by John Kasich with 20.4% and Ted Cruz with 15.9%. Interestingly, Ben Carson pulled 1.3%. Approximately 70,000 votes were cast.

Delaware is a winner-take-all state. As a result, all 16 delegates went to Trump.

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Maryland: Donald Trump also won in Maryland, with 54.4% of the vote. John Kasich was a healthy second at 23%, and Ted Cruz in third with a respectable 18.9% of the vote. Approximately 435,635 votes were cast.

Maryland’s 14 at-large delegates are awarded winner-take-all, as are the three RNC delegates and the one bonus. The rest are awarded by congressional district. As a result, we project Donald Trump, who won every district, will take all 38 delegates, and Cruz and Kasich, of course, none.


Pennsylvania: It’s the odd man out when it comes to awarding delegates, but right in line when it comes to winners. Donald Trump again took the win with 56.7% of the vote. Ted Cruz came in second this time, with 21.6%, and John Kasich in third with 19.4%. Approximately 1,573,00 votes were cast.

Pennsylvania sends 71 delegates to the convention, but 54 of those delegates are directly elected and are unbound. (This is why the campaigns were handing out flyers with delegate names on them, so that supporters of the various candidates could vote for delegates who were sympathetic to their preferred presidential pick.)

The remaining delegates are winner-take-all, which means Donald Trump has picked up a known, pledged 17 delegates in Pennsylvania, and an as yet unknown number of delegates from the 54 unbound.


Rhode Island: Rhode Island, too, went for Donald Trump, who picked up 63.8% of the vote. Gov. Kasich came in second with 24.4%, and Senator Cruz in third with 10.4%. Approximately 61,194 votes were cast.

Rhode Island’s 19 delegates are assigned proportionally. As a result, Donald Trump gained 11 delegates, while Kasich picked up 5 and Cruz only 3, in both cases their only bound delegates of the night.


DEMOCRATS: Hillary won four of the five, with Bernie Sanders winning only in tiny Rhode Island. It is projected that Hillary will now be about 300 pledged delegates ahead of Bernie. There’s really no way he’s going to make up that difference. And he knows it.


[As always, please note this are the best projections based on information available at the time of the posting and are subject to change.]

And now for the big moment: the delegate totals.

The Day: RedState puts the new total delegates to date (for the remaining three) at:
DONALD TRUMP:        957
SEN. TED CRUZ:            562
GOV. JOHN KASICH:   154

Note that this means Kasich is STILL behind Senator Marco Rubio, who has 173 pledged delegates.

Also note that there are 118 unbound, including Pennsylvania’s 54 from today. Unbound does not necessarily mean unknown or no preference.

And finally, do note how many of these delegates were awarded on a winner-take-all basis. That means Trump got a higher share of the delegates than he did of the vote. Surely he and his supporters will complain about how unfair and undemocratic that is, right? Right???


For more on what all this means, read Leon Wolf’s article here.

Sources include CNN, AP, The Green Papers, Bing, and campaign data.