On Fox News Sunday, Congressman Trey Gowdy spoke with Chris Wallace about, of course, the Mueller investigation, the pending indictment, and what it all means. Bucking the Republican tide, Gowdy is not ready to throw Mueller to the wolves just yet.

In fact, Gowdy is rather complimentary of the former FBI Director, and also calls into question why anyone would think there is a conflict of interest or need for recusal here.


WALLACE: There have been growing calls from some Republicans to end the Mueller investigation. Some people say he’s too close to Comey and the FBI, and that he ought to resign. Some people say that when the Mueller budget for the special counsel investigation is presented to congress to review next month that they should cut off funding. Do you support any effort to either curtail or end the Mueller investigation?

GOWDY: I don’t, and I readily concede I’m in an increasingly small group of Republicans. I think Bob Mueller has a really distinguished career of service to our country. I don’t think any of your viewers can think of a single thing he did as the FBI Director that caused them to have a lack of confidence in him. I think most of your viewers have to be reminded that he actually was the FBI director or that he actually was a U.S. Attorney, because he’s a pretty apolitical guy.

I see the reporting, I see the same thing you’re making reference to, that he and Comey are friends. I’m not really sure what the definition of that is. Ive got a lot of coworkers that it wouldn’t stop me from investigating them or prosecuting them. So, they’re not family members, they weren’t business partners. I would encourage my Republican friends, give the guy a chance to do his job. The result will be known by the facts, by what he uncovers. if the personalities involved are much less important to me than the underlying facts. So I would say, give the guy a chance to do his job.

As is typical of Rep. Gowdy, he is succinct and to the point. He covers pretty much every objection to Mueller, save the rather petty complaints that some of his staff and investigators gave money, like President Trump did, to Democrats in the past. Gowdy probably saw no need to address that thin point.

But he does address Mueller’s credibility, career, and the notion of a conflict of interest,basically saying there isn’t one. Of course, he also discusses the leaks, and says that “someone” on Mueller’s team violated their oath of secrecy later in the same interview. But clearly he’s not ready to dump Mueller over that. Especially considering that we don’t actually know who did it.

The bigger point, the most important point, is that we don’t even know the facts yet. We don’t know who is being charged, or for what, or on what evidence. It doesn’t take being a former prosecutor, like Gowdy, to know that if you’re calling for his ouster before you know the facts then you’re not operating on the facts. You’re being a partisan.

It’s time to let the chips fall. And to let the man do his job.