Jerry Seinfeld says firing Roseanne was unnecessary.

Speaking to Entertainment Tonight Monday about his new season of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee hitting Netflix, the TV icon made his position clear:

“I didn’t see why it was necessary to fire her. Why would you murder someone who’s committing suicide?”

Interesting point.

Jerry expressed amazement at the damage done with a single click:

“But I never saw someone ruin their entire career with one button push. That was fresh.”

He went on to suggest another actress should be cast in Roseanne’s part:

“I think they should get another Roseanne. They brought Dan Conner back; he was dead, and they brought him back. So why can’t we get another Roseanne? There’s other funny women that could do that part. You need to get the comic in there. I hate to see a comic lose a job.”

In my opinion, in a just world, this is the way the Roseanne situation should’ve gone down:

Once her tweet pegged the viral meter red, those in the media should have asked her to explain herself. At that point, she could have relayed her answer to the world: she didn’t know Jarrett was Jewish, and she had no intention to make a racial comment.

Would you have believed her? I would. And do.

From there, companies — like ABC, which has since greenlighted a spinoff show, The Conners — and the public could have made their own assessment. But it seems to me that her plight exemplifies a problem in the culture: we are quick to condemn.

The Left have accused police officers of shooting first and asking questions later (read my article about that allegation here). But it is we who do that. The citizens. The Left, for certain, and those on the Right, too.

If someone commits an act which appears to be egregious, I believe they should have the right to explain. No one gave Roseanne that opportunity. And that fact — like a racist tweet — is, to me, unacceptable.

 

What do you think about all this? Is Jerry right? Am I? Sound off in the Comments section.

Read about the media’s treatment of Peter Fonda — and how it differed from that of Roseanne — here.

For something completely different, check out my article about the Miss America pageant.

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