If you’re a police officer, a California professor believes you need to be killed.

He’s said as much.

And yet, he continues to find employment in the public education system.

At the University of California, Davis.

According to multiple sources, Joshua Clover tweeted this on November 27th, 2014:

“I am thankful that every living cop will one day be dead, some by their own hand, some by others, too many of old age #letsnotmakemore”

And yet, he continued to find employment in the public education system.

Exactly one month later, the teacher delivered another pearl via social media:

“I mean, it’s easier to shoot cops when their backs are turned, no?”

Not to rest on his pining-for-police-peril laurels, during a September 2015 interview with San Francisco Weekly, the self-professed communist proposed  the following in response to the question, “What’s wrong with society today?”:

“People think that cops need to be reformed. They need to be killed.”

Nick Irvin of UC Davis’s newspaper, The California Aggie, emailed Joshua and asked if he’d reconsidered his prior cop-killing comments.

This was in light of the recent ambush and murder of officer Natalie Corona, who Irvin described thusly:

Corona, an up-and-coming Davis police officer who was gunned down last month, was the type of person who makes labelling all law enforcement as “bad” a simple exercise in fallacy. By all accounts, she was a kind and considerate person who cared deeply about the community she served. She was pictured giving a bag of must-haves to a former resident of Paradise over the holidays. She reportedly gave a man she arrested a few dollars so he could buy a meal when he was released. Corona embodied the moral imperatives enshrined in our campus Principles of Community, the idea that “a climate of equity and justice demonstrated by respect for one another” is not only important, but necessary.

Joshua’s reply, published Tuesday:

“I think we can all agree that the most effective way to end any violence against officers is the complete and immediate abolition of the police.”

Ladies and gentleman, a man employed by the public education system.

Here’s Irvin’s sketch of the revolutionary:

He’s well-known throughout literary circles, his poetry examining latent struggles against capitalism and his latest book explaining the act of rioting from a decidedly Marxist point of view. His work has been featured in The Nation and The New York Times. Clover is also one of three co-founders of Commune Editions, a publisher specializing in anarchist and communist poetry, and a contributing editor for Commune Magazine, a quarterly magazine “found wherever enemies of the current order gather.” He was part of a group of protestors slapped with conspiracy and obstruction of movement charges during a U.S. Bank sit-in on campus in 2012 loosely tied to the Occupy movement.

The Aggie’s story spotlighted Joshua’s aforementioned incendiary remarks, prompting a reprimand from the school:

The UC Davis administration condemns the statement of Professor Clover to which you refer. It does not reflect our institutional values, and we find it unconscionable that anyone would condone much less appear to advocate murder.

Well that’s nice.

Speaking to CBS 13 about uproar over the Aggie piece, the instructor declined to rescind his homicidal hopes:

“On the day that police have as much to fear from literature professors as black kids do from police, I will definitely have a statement.”

If I could, I’d send this article to jerky Josh, who’s a Power User of Step Stupid.

More from CBS:

“Clover is currently on medical leave but is scheduled to teach English and Literature at the university.”

As an employee of the public education system.

If you’re a parent of a college-age child, a California professor believes you need to be undermined.

-Alex

 

Relevant RedState links in this article: here and here.

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