The Left has decided the segregation of the 50’s was right after all — there really are only two races: white and non-white.

And if you’re the wrong one of those two, then there’s nothing more woke these days than apologizing for your rotten pathetic self and all your rotten pathetic privilege.

A veteran NBA player attempted such a mea culpa Monday, but Fox sportswriter and former ESPN personality Jason Whitlock wasn’t having it.

In an article on race relations in America published to The Players Tribune, Utah Jazz star Kyle Korver waxed philosophic, beginning his essay with, “When the police break your teammate’s leg, you’d think it would wake you up a little.”

Waking — or woking — is exactly what he did:

“I know that, as a white man, I have to hold my fellow white men accountable. … As white people, are we guilty of the sins of our forefathers? No, I don’t think so. But are we responsible for them? Yes, I believe we are.”

So be warned: If you’re white, he’s holding you accountable. Because he’s white. And so that’s his job. You whiteys.

He went on to a statistical rundown:

“The fact that black Americans are more than five times as likely to be incarcerated as white Americans is wrong. The fact that black Americans are more than twice as likely to live in poverty as white Americans is wrong. The fact that black unemployment rates nationally are double that of overall unemployment rates is wrong. The fact that black imprisonment rates for drug charges are almost six times higher nationally than white imprisonment rates for drug charges is wrong. The fact that black Americans own approximately one-tenth of the wealth that white Americans own is wrong. The fact that inequality is built so deeply into so many of our most trusted institutions is wrong. And I believe it’s the responsibility of anyone on the privileged end of those inequalities to help make things right.”

It’d be interesting to know from where he derives the idea that “inequality is built so deeply into so many of our most trusted institutions.” Which institutions? How?

Jason Whitlock — who, in Leftese, is a non-white (or, as they say, “person of color”) — wasn’t impressed. He made that clear on the Fox Sports show Speak for Yourself:

“I’d like to congratulate Utah Jazz guard Kyle Korver on his entry into Woke Heaven.”

Whoa — somebody’s puttin’ some speed on the ball (oh, sorry — wrong sport).

“Korver walked through the Pearly Gates yesterday shortly after The Players Tribune published his white-privilege manifesto that neatly touched every Silicon Valley-inspired talking point known to man. Blue-checked Twitter lost its mind, hailing Korver’s well-orchestrated word salad as the white man’s letter from a Birmingham jail. According to my well-informed sources, here’s what Korver will find in his woke afterlife: Under the thousands of retweets and likes, a VIP pass to the Shaun King and Deray McKesson meet-and-greet, and a half-dozen almost-version Instagram models.”

Jason’s got quite a way with words.

He explained that he awards you no points for social justice platitudes that are a mile deep and an inch wide:

“Here’s what he won’t find in Woke Heaven: solution, equality, or reality. Woke Heaven only exists on social media. The matrix built by the tech companies to dumb the masses to the point that we think that delusional groupthink, spewed by millionaire celebrities and athletes, is courageous, original thought.”

To Jason, Kyle’s message was just more generic hooey from some rich dude:

“There were no original thoughts in Korver’s piece. It was a collage of everyday Twitter talking points that some people found powerful because they appeared under the byline of a white millionaire basketball player. Some people believe the white man’s ice is cold; I don’t. Korver’s piece was at best a surface-level buzzword critique of the American criminal justice system; at worst, it was a condescending misguided bigotry that argued white men such as Korver must take on the burden of feeling very, very sorry for black people and a responsibility of uplifting us from dire circumstances.”

Jason’s conclusion was startling, grilling the martyrdom of today’s white warriors for wokeness:

“There were no original thoughts in Korver’s piece. It was a collage of everyday Twitter talking points that some people found powerful because they appeared under the byline of a white millionaire basketball player. Some people believe the white man’s ice is cold; I don’t. Korver’s piece was at best a surface-level buzzword critique of the American criminal justice system; at worst, it was a condescending misguided bigotry that argued white men such as Korver must take on the burden of feeling very, very sorry for black people and a responsibility of uplifting us from dire circumstances.”

Wow.

I have a rule for anyone who speaks out about inequality. Unless they’ve first made themself “equal,” they’re — to put it bluntly — full of crap.

If you want to talk about income inequality, or income redistribution, or anything to do with a Communist system of forced evenness, you’re vetted according to whether or not you’ve started with yourself. The average household income in America is around $50,000. Once you’ve given away all your family’s money — for life — beyond that sum, I consider your thoughts worth listening to.

Kyle wrote, “The fact that black Americans own approximately one-tenth of the wealth that white Americans own is wrong. The fact that inequality is built so deeply into so many of our most trusted institutions is wrong. And I believe it’s the responsibility of anyone on the privileged end of those inequalities to help make things right.”

He wants to make things right.

Kyle Korver’s net worth is $30 million.

Once he’s given away every penny of his household’s wealth — to random black people — minus $50K a year, I’m all ears. He’ll be wrong about forcing an equality of outcome; but at least he’ll have ceased to be a gigantic, stunning, phenomenally extreme hypocrite.

Make yourself equal; then talk about how everyone else should be.

That seems right to me. How about you?

Watch Jason Whitlock do it to it in the video below.

-Alex

 

See 3 more pieces from me: Chelsea Manning & a political makeover, Santa Fe & the mind of the Left, and Deadpool 2 & the changing world.

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