When Brett Kavanaugh was appointed to be the next justice of the Supreme Court, his alma mater, Yale Law, had every reason to be proud of this accomplishment.

They posted a statement on the Yale Law website featuring accolades from Dean Heather K. Gerken, and professors as well as saying that, upon confirmation, he will join three other Yale alum on the highest court in the land.

More than 200 alumni, students, and faculty responded with an open letter expressing outrage at this statement. In the usual measured tone of 2018, the letter declared that “people will die if he is confirmed.” Wow, ok. Honestly, I’m impressed Yale Law hasn’t taken down the statement. Academia doesn’t usually have much of a backbone.

They did, however, release another statement saying that they are a non-partisan institution that acknowledges high-profile accomplishments by their alumni. They pointed out that they did the same for Sonia Sotomayor when she was appointed by the Supreme Court. As no one could accuse her of being conservative, I assume the outrage mob didn’t think coroners were going to run out of ink listing “SCOTUS confirmation” as cause of death.

On Saturday, Yale Law student and Campus Reform contributor student Emily Hall stopped by Fox & Friends to discuss the kerfuffle.

Hall tells Fox & Friends that she was nervous about attending Yale Law because of their liberal bent, so she was pleasantly surprised to see the school supporting Kavanaugh and celebrating his nomination. She goes on to say that it’s becoming difficult for universities to be non-partisan because they’re treated so poorly when they act fairly.

I’m not usually the biggest fan of the ivies, because they usually don’t give me much reason to be, but Yale has given me a pleasant surprise here.