The story of Harvey Weinstein’s decades of sexual harassment and assault opened the floodgates, allowing many women to step forward and tell their story for the first time. People in the entertainment industry, the business world, and the political arena began to drop like flies. And with good reason.

Some of the stories have ignited debates as to whether or not the accused faced a valid accusation. The allegations made against Aziz Ansari pit people across ideological lines with some arguing what he did amounted to sexual assault, while others said the story was awkward but ultimately an unfair charge. These debates will likely continue.

Another familiar name surfaced in this discussion: Hillary Clinton. 

The New York Times reported Clinton kept a senior adviser on her campaign even after accusations surfaced of him repeatedly sexually harassing a young female aide. From the story:

A senior adviser to Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign who was accused of repeatedly sexually harassing a young subordinate was kept on the campaign at Mrs. Clinton’s request, according to four people familiar with what took place.

Mrs. Clinton’s campaign manager at the time recommended that she fire the adviser, Burns Strider. But Mrs. Clinton did not. Instead, Mr. Strider was docked several weeks of pay and ordered to undergo counseling, and the young woman was moved to a new job.

Mr. Strider, who was Mrs. Clinton’s faith adviser, was a founder of the American Values Network and sent the candidate scripture readings every morning for months during the campaign, was hired five years later to lead an independent group that supported Mrs. Clinton’s 2016 candidacy, Correct the Record, which was created by a close Clinton ally, David Brock.

She docked his pay and ordered him to undergo counseling.

That has a ring of familiarity to it. It brings to mind the Catholic Church and how they would send priests to “treatment centers” following abuse allegations. The Clinton revelations stink, but when looking back over the last twenty-five years, this wouldn’t be the first time Hillary took the see-no-evil approach to sexual harassment. Her life turned into a series of calculated decisions that she believed would result in the ultimate goal: Being elected the first woman president in United States history.

Naturally, Hillary knows this issue won’t be a good look for her, so she’s already playing damage control on Twitter:

She was “dismayed.” And how were the young woman’s concerns addressed? She was shuffled off to work somewhere else while Strider maintained his position minus some pay and few visits to a shrink. Hillary felt it was more important to keep him around. When she ran again, she raised no objections to her number one fan, David Brock, hiring Strider to run Correct The Record.

It all hearkens back to the late 1990’s when more severe allegations against Bill Clinton surfaced beyond his reputation for serial philandering. Charges of sexual harassment, sexual assault and of course, his taking advantage of a White House intern for sexual pleasure all came to light. Who was there to defend Bill the entire time?

Hillary. 

Hillary Clinton not only stood by her man, but she actively engaged in the smearing of women she claims “deserve to be heard.” Hillary Clinton called Gennifer Flowers, “trailer trash.” She referred to Monica Lewinsky as a “narcissistic loony-toon.” She said nothing when her friend and political confidante, James Carville said of Paula Jones, “Drag a one-hundred-dollar bill through a trailer park, you never know what you’ll find.” She coined the phrase, “bimbo eruptions” in 1991 when discussing allegations that could surface about Bill.

None of it mattered to her. These women did not “deserve to be heard” because it could derail her aspirational plans. The only thing that mattered was advancing her political career beyond the title of “First Lady.” Power, not the rights of women, comes first for Hillary Clinton.

If the country is lucky, her previous campaign was her last campaign.