AP featured image
FILE – In this Sept. 30, 2005 file photo, O.J. Simpson signs autographs during an event hosted by the “NecroComicon” horror convention in Northridge, Calif. A lawyer for the family of Fred Goldman says O.J. Simpson is profiting from autographs since his release from prison and should pay the money toward a wrongful death judgment exceeding $70 million. Attorney David Cook plans to ask a Los Angeles Superior Court judge Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, to order Simpson to hand over future money he makes autographing sports memorabilia to satisfy the judgment in the wrongful deaths of Ron Goldman and Simpson’s ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

Former NFL star and actor O.J. Simpson hasn’t exactly stayed out of the public eye, since he was paroled in late September 2017, after serving nine years in prison for armed robbery.

Of course, I have to mention – up top – that Simpson was accused of killing his former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman in 1994; He was acquitted of all charges the next year. (And as ABC News noted at the time of his release on the robbery charges, “Simpson was found liable for the killings in a 1997 civil trial….[A] spokesman for the Goldmans…. said in the statement that the civil judgment awarded to the Goldmans has climbed to over $66 million.) Then there’s a very famous police chase involving a White Bronco — one of the visuals from the tragic episode that remains seared into our collective memories.

But I’m going to ask you to try to put those things aside for a moment. As I was saying, O.J. Simpson has always liked attention. So it didn’t surprise many people when he opened a Twitter account in June 2019 to, as he put it in one of his first videos, “challenge a lot of that B.S. and set the record straight….More importantly, I’ll be able to talk about everything, especially sports and fantasy football, and even politics,” CNN reported.

He’s kept that promise. In his two, most recent tweets, posted Wednesday and Thursday, Simpson shared short videos in which he delved into politics and sports — sometimes, at the same time.

In the first video, he talked about the protests about George Floyd’s murder, which have, in recent days, been overtaken by looting and violence, including attacks on police and other security officials that have led to their deaths. As my colleague Elizabeth Vaughn shared on Wednesday, many on the Left have done nothing to quell those flames — in fact, some seem to be fanning them with their hateful rhetoric about law enforcement. And Brandon Morse wrote about their calls to defund police departments across America.

You may be surprised, like I was, that Simpson doesn’t spout leftist talking points on the protesters and rioters. And has a sensible solution for “bad” cops in police ranks:

Simpson said:

Hey, Twitter, yours truly. Last night was a lot better, because most of the legitimate protesters, they were doing sit-ins. I thought the previous nights, they were being used by the looters, because they were running around. The looters was [sic] using them as smokescreens, and police didn’t know who to go after. Last night was a lot better.

I saw a police officer who’s the head of something, some union, and he said that it was bad, because all police officers of America felt like they had a target on ’em. That is bad. But, you know what? Maybe there’s a lesson to be learned there, because as far as I know, over the years, all black men, whenever a police car came up behind them or next to them — well, we felt like we had a bullseye on us. So, maybe they ought to use that to, maybe, to better understand how black guys feel when police officers approach them.

I don’t know if these protests are gonna work. I mean, we’ve been doing them for years. I know the media, they get their scoops from the police. So, I don’t really count on them. You know what’s going to stop this from happening? It’s policemen! The good policemen have got to start reporting the bad policemen. Every TV show you see or movie you see, I.A. internal affairs, who are the people who investigate the police – police the police – they’re considered the bad guys. If one of those guys had turned in Chauvin [unclear] video, he would have be ostracized by the precinct.

That is what has to stop! The police have to turn in the bad police — they know who they are. I’m just saying. Take care.

In a shorter video he shared this afternoon, after his normal greeting to Twitter, “yours truly,” Simpson told Saints QB Drew Brees that his recent comments on Colin Kaepernick were “bad timing”:

Well, every day is something new, isn’t it? You know. Today is “Drew Brees.” Oh, Drew, buddy, bad timing! Look, you have a right to say what you feel, and I don’t totally disagree with you. But I think you’re missing the point — as much of America did when [Colin] Kaepernick took a knee. Kaepernick was tryin’ to bring attention to something. He wasn’t trying to disrespect the military or America.

Unfortunately, we live in a time where there’s no meaningful change without something drastic happening. And taking that knee was kind of a, maybe, drastic measure. But don’t think for one moment, that all of the guys who have taken a knee since then, they’re doin’ it to disrespect the military or our country. Unfortunately, too many people, including our President, made it about that.

I  always thought… Drew, I know you’re from Texas, you played at Purdue, but you’re from Texas. I always thought that the Confederate flag disrespected the American flag, because what it represented was an attempt to divide our country — and I also thought it represented a support of slavery. I know that you didn’t mean to offend anybody. And what I know of your history, Drew, the things that you’ve done in the past, you certainly warrant people taking your apology. I accept your apology. I wasn’t really offended by it. But I certainly accept your apology. And I hope America does.

In any event, stay healthy. COVID-19 is still out there. I’m just saying. Take care.

What do you think about what O.J. had to say about the police or about Brees’ apology? Leave your thoughts in the comment area below!

Becca Lower
Becca Lower is a writer with RedState and formerly worked at IJR.com as a writer and editor. She grew up outside Cincinnati, OH, in former Speaker John Boehner's district, and currently lives in Mesa, AZ.

Find her on Twitter at @BeccaJLower. Direct all tips/marriage proposals: [email protected]
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