A quieter weekend was found as studios eased back on releases to allow some room for existing titles that were recognized by The Academy this week. To give lauded films wider exposure scant few new arrivals were seen, and those were rather miserable in their performances — and quality.

Tuesday’s Oscar nominations being announced led to a handful of holdover titles getting expanded screen exposure to capitalize on the hype. “Green Book” added over 1,500 screens to re-enter the top-10. “The Favourite” glommed 10 nominations so it shows on 1,000+ additional screens this week, “Vice” adds nearly 400, “Bohemian Rhapsody” nearly 250, and “A Star Is Born” shows on 777 more this weekend.

Here are the soft numbers from a soft weekend.

GLASS – $19.04 Million
For a time it was performing as well as its predecessor in the franchise, “Split”, and the decent hold of -52% in week two keeps it on pace. Expectations were that it would have been a few million below this return, so the title is showing some strength. It will be helped by another weak field next weekend, before “The Lego Movie 2” opens February 8.

2. THE UPSIDE – $12.24m
Showing remarkable staying power in week #3, this is only an -18% drop over last weekend. Looks more like the attempt at generating a controversy over this production has done little to impact interest.

3. AQUAMAN – $7.35m
Continuing it steady rise, the next landmark will be to see if it makes it over $800 million in foreign receipts. It has recently passed Christopher Nolan’s “Dark Knight” films to become the biggest DC Comics  worldwide money earner.

4. THE KID WHO WOULD BE KING – $7.25m
This Fox entry has some solid reviews, and audiences were rather favorable with a “B+” CinemaScore. There just was not enough interest to draw people into theaters in the first place. Expectations were mild to begin with, guessing a return of around $10 million was in store, so this is even more of a let down. Considering it has a weighty (if not massive) budget of around $60 million the film will need extremely helpful foreign numbers to bring it up to profitability.

5. SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE – $6.15m
In a bit of multiple universe parallels to the plot of the movie, to date it has earned $170 million domestically, and $170 million in foreign revenue as well.

6. GREEN BOOK – $5.41m
Experiencing the biggest push after the Oscar nominations were announced (the film is now up for Best Film, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Screenplay, and Editing) it has also netted a win as the pick from the Producers Guild Awards, which gives it some heft heading into the big ceremony.

7. A DOG’S WAY HOME – $5.22m
This canine-based family pic has managed to retrieve some dollars in a soft market. It has already dug up $30 million in total, something few had anticipated.

8. SERENITY – $4.8m
An early contender for Worst Film of the Year! (Yes, I am excited.) Matthew McConaughey and Anne Hathaway star in the drama the studio Aviron dumped with little fanfare. Major stars, in a January release, with few critics screenings, and barely anything spent on promoting it are signs of big trouble. The critics have been lacerating this one, and it is looking to become a bad-film classic.

9. ESCAPE ROOM – $4.27m
Much like “Dog’s Way” this one has no real business lingering around, and yet this cheapie (made for under $10 million) is poised to cross the $50 million mark by next week.

10. DRAGON BALL SUPER: BROLY – $3.6m
The surprise of last week takes a sevre -62% drop, but no one at FUNimation Releasing (they distributed the Japanese production) is complaining. Almost $30 million has rolled in, and I’m betting they would have been satisfied at half that return.

 

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