Image from Twitter @Acosta

This is NOT the way to promote your book.

As many of you know, CNN’s Jim Acosta has just published a book about himself and his journalism during the Trump administration — The Enemy Of The People: A Dangerous Time To Tell The Truth In America. Jim’s entire hook has been to highlight the risky travails he has encountered in this grievously dangerous profession he has chosen — media star.

To suggest the sale of his book has been flagging is not an exaggeration. The tile, which was officially for sale this week, is not scorching the best-seller lists. At Amazon, it is not a top-10, nor even top-20 seller. One needs to scroll down to find it nestled at #25, a few spots below the latest release of the children’s books Dogman, and Diary Of A Wimpy Kid #14. In the sub-category Politics/Social Sciences it is at #14, in the sub-category Memoirs it rises to #13, and only ticks off the top spot in the sub-subcategory Biographies-Professional & Academic. (For the record, in a convenient act of rebuttal, Mark Levin’s Unfreedom Of The Press sits at #1 of all books sold.)

In response Acosta has been pimping his release strongly on his social media accounts. This is understandable, as you are wise to promote yourself digitally as much as you can. Yet the manner Acosta goes about doing so is — well, patently Acosta. This is the man with a deep-seated affection for himself, and he relishes any chance to inject himself into a story, going so far to even turn the reporting onto himself. But he fails to acknowledge that most are attuned to his self-aggrandizement, so his self-promotion takes on a shallower appearance.

In many of his tweets about the book he is not using quotes from others touting his work, or providing a string of glowing critical reviews about the book. Instead he is offering excerpts out of the book and his tweets are quoting passages. This means the man, who has a string of affairs with various mirrors across the country, ends up quoting himself in passages where he is referencing himself, in the book that is centered around himself, and was written by — himself. That is some next-level narcissistic inception taking place.

In one of these tweets he offers a very curious passage regarding a pair of his news rivals. In this passage, he details something that happened (or specifically, what did not happen) when he personally encountered two Fox News hosts.


So two bitter rivals did not create a scene in a professional setting — and that was a problem? Further, if they not confronting him was a problem then would it not be required to say that Acosta himself is also guilty of what he is accusing here? I mean, here he is writing about them directly in his nationally published book, and he never approached them to say anything specific to their faces. That is at least an equal measure of what he implies is cowardice.

Then there is the hilarity of his suggesting Hannity and the bowtie-wearing Tucker Carlson are to somehow be perceived as “macho”. For him to declare this becomes a tacit admission that he himself is a beta-male by comparison. Not that many would be surprised by this detail.

Acosta even manages to compound things with his text in this tweet. Behold the level of whining in this delivery.

Again, Jim fails to realize that he failed to say anything to Hannity before writing about him, but Sean failing to confront Jim is a cause for scorn. The laughable part is how he “offered” to come on Hannity’s top-rated program to talk about his book, the one desperately in need of a boost in sales. He comes off sounding like the Democrats, whose party has openly denied Fox News but sees its candidates desperate to have town halls staged on the top-rated new network.

But sounding like the Democrats is nothing new for Jim Acosta, even though he will insist he is the paragon of journalistic professionalism. If you do not believe him just go to his Twitter feed — he will let you know, repeatedly.