The Oversight Committee came on in full force when discussing Hillary’s email scandal recently.

Yesterday we covered how Jason Chaffetz asserted congress’s authority in all matters classified – especially in the Oversight Committee’s case – and served a subpoena with a side of sass. They extracted testimony from Clinton tech, Justin Cooper, who admitted to having access to Clinton’s classified emails despite having zero clearance for doing so. Then we capped with Trey Gowdy getting into a borderline shouting match with Stephen Lynch when Lynch tried to make excuses for a key Clinton witness who decided not to show to the hearing, despite being subpoenaed.

But that wasn’t all Trey Gowdy did during the recent hearing. When Jason Herring, the FBI’s acting assistant director of legislative affairs, was being a bit dodgy with information requested by congress, Gowdy was not having it.

Gowdy was after documents called a 302, which is essentially a summary of interviews of key witnesses. The FBI wasn’t giving those to congress, and instead were getting “summary of a summary of an interview” instead. This is something the committee, and Gowdy in particular, was not pleased with. This, especially, with Herring telling Gowdy that he had been provided with all the relevant information, and the rest of it will come out through the FOIA (freedom of information act) request.

“I think we’ve given the relevant ones-” started Herring.

“Relevant according to whom? I’m telling you, I don’t think you’ve given me all the relevant 302s!” said Gowdy.

“Well the remainder of the 302s will come out through the FOIA process.” returned Herring.

“But since when did congress have to go through FOIA to obtain 302s from an investigation that’s not even resulting in any prosecutions that your boss has already said was over. Since when did we have to go through FOIA?” Gowdy fired back.

At that point, Gowdy was out of time, but before he relinquished his spotlight, he reminded the FBI agent of how things really are.

“With all due respect, you don’t get to decide what we think is relevant.” said Gowdy.