The bubble that Hollywood leftists live in remains strong an unbroken, even in the face of falling ratings, and the election of a president that – so long as an R remains next to his name – stands against everything they claim to believe in.

Last night’s Emmy’s showed another decline with a two percent drop, continuing a trend of falling popularity that, frankly, shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone at this point.

For at least over half of the American populace, award shows are something you tune into when you feel like being insulted for your beliefs, decisions, or preferences. Americans tune in to watch people in expensive clothing preach against your stances as more people wearing glittering jewelry cheer and applaud.

Many Americans have grown tired of the parade of glitterati virtue signaling as they pat themselves on the back for winning awards they often don’t deserve. It’s why the steep drop from 2013’s 17.3 million viewers to 2016’s 11.3 million viewers occurred. It’s why the Emmys have seen yet another drop this year.

And this year proved to even more Americans that they likely won’t be watching in 2018. Colbert’s Trump bashing at best merited a quick chuckle, and Tomlin and Fonda used their “9 to 5” on stage reunion to call Trump a “sexist, egotistical, lying, hypocritical bigot.”

Alec Baldwin, who won an award for impersonating Trump, took his own swipes at the president, but earned the biggest groan — at least from me — when he literally cheered himself and his fellow elite on by talking about how important they are.

I just want to say — if I leave anybody out I’m sorry — but I do want to get this in — which is, you know, I always remember what someone told me — that is when you die you don’t remember a bill that Congress passed or a decision the Supreme Court made, or an address made by the president. You remember a song. You remember a line from a movie. You remember a play. You remember a book. A painting. A poem. What we do is important. And for all of you out there in motion pictures and television, don’t stop doing what you are doing. The audience is counting on you. Thank you.

How he knows what people remember after the die was not explained by Baldwin, but he is holding an Emmy, so we should definitely listen to his wisdom.

But even if you’re not Trump’s biggest fan, the political commentary becomes tiring. Award shows have become more like CNN panels instead of recognition for excellently executed escapism. Even Trump haters seem to be done with the political jabs, as highlighted by Variety.

The onslaught of Trump jokes during Colbert’s opener drew tepid, if in some cases, blasé reactions. “I’m so sick of hearing about Trump,” one audience member sighed. “There’s nothing fresh about these jokes anymore,” yawned another. “And I hate Trump more than anything. Can’t we just ever get away from him?”

Hollywood’s unflinching dedication to leftist politics has left it a predictable, boring mess of uninspired jokes, and political platitudes that make it hard to watch. The glimpses inside the Hollywood bubble that award shows give us make many wonder if any of the coastal elite have ever spoken to a member of the fly-over peasantry they’re in the job to entertain.

If they had, then they would probably understand that falling ratings both at their self-congratulatory ceremonies and the theaters is a result of a citizenry not wanting to partake in the culture Hollywood is serving up. This was perfectly illustrated in the rejection of Hillary Clinton in 2016 despite her star-studded backing. This was evident in the rejection of the encroaching leftist culture in favor of a reality show host that continuously polled less likable than his leftist opponent.

Since life in the gilded cage is very unlike the kind seen in the rest of the world, allow me to help those in Hollywood understand how business works.

If the product isn’t selling despite providing the best marketing money can ask for, then the people must want something different. Continuing to push the same product will not only result in a loss of cash, but a loss of faith in the customer.

Right now, Hollywood’s product is bland and unfulfilling. It tastes bad, and doesn’t feel good when you’ve finally gotten it down. Fewer and fewer are walking away satisfied, and more and more are choosing just not to consume the product at all.

To improve the product, change what recipes aren’t working, and expand your ideological menu. Invite more people to the table, and show them that they were considered with care. If they don’t, then they will continue to see a decline in their customer base.