Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo held a press conference on Wednesday, where he dropped some interesting information pertaining to Sunday’s Las Vegas Shooter, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock.

Paddock posted up on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel, where he shot down into a crowd attending a Jason Aldean concert. He killed 59 people, and wounded hundreds more. According to authorities, Paddock shot himself before they could get into his room to stop him. He was found with multiple rifles in his room, some of which were attached with scopes, bipods, and bump stocks according to photo evidence.

Up until lately, Paddock’s killing spree was described by Lombardo as a “solo act,” but Wednesday brought about a new take. According to Lombardo, all evidence points to multiple players.

“Look at this. You look at the weapon obtaining the different amounts of tannerite available, do you think this was all accomplished on his own, face value?” asked Lombardo.

“You got to make the assumption he had to have help at some point, and we want to insure that’s the answer,” added Lombardo. “Maybe he’s a super guy, super hero–not a hero, super–I won’t use the word. Maybe he’s super — that was working out this out on his own, but it will be hard for me to believe that.”

“Here’s the reason why, put one and one–two and two together, another residence in Reno with firearms, okay, electronics and everything else associated with larger amounts of ammo, a place in Mesquite, we know he had a girlfriend,” said Lombardo. “Do you think this is all self-facing individual without talking to somebody, it was sequestered amongst himself. Come on focus folks these type of investigations have been occurring in the last few years and we have to investigate that.”

According to the Guardian, Lombardo also added that there is new evidence that Paddock intended to survive the ordeal, though he did not go into what kind of evidence there was to back this up.

Lombardo’s theories seemed to run afoul with FBI agent Aaron Rouse, who took to the podium right after Lombado.

“Theories are great and everyone can have a theory,” said Rouse, who runs the FBI’s Las Vegas division. “But I need to deal with facts. The sheriff needs to deal with facts. He’s not going to make assumptions. I’m not going to make assumptions.”

Many questions still remain about Paddock, Paddock’s intent, his choice of victims, and more. Everyone from his family, to his girlfriend had no idea that he was planning a violent attack of any kind, and his killing spree matches no previous hallmarks for mass shooters.

At this time, Paddock is America’s most unsolved mystery.