An August 2017 counterterrorism report from the FBI listed “black identity extremists” (BIE) as domestic terrorists.

The report, originally obtained by Foreign Policy, noted that BIE’s target police for violence, and justify their actions against authorities by making it seem a defensive action against continued police brutality.

“The FBI assesses it is very likely Black Identity Extremist (BIE) perceptions of police brutality against African Americans spurred an increase in premeditated, retaliatory lethal violence against law enforcement and will very likely serve as justification for such violence,” reads the report.

According to the FBI, they believe the increase in violence by BIE began with Mike Brown’s shooting at the hands of Officer Darren Wilson, after Brown attempted to fight Wilson hand to hand. Brown’s death kickstarted the Black Lives Matter movement, which has exhibited extreme amounts of anti-white, and anti-police sentiment.

From the report:

The FBI assess it is very likely this increase began following the 9 August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and the subsequent Grand Jury November 2014 declination to indict the police officers involved. The FBI assesses it is very likely incidents of alleged police abuse against African Americans since then have continued to feed the resurgence in ideologically motivated, violent criminal activity within the BIE movement. The FBI assesses it is very likely some BIEs are influenced by a mix of anti-authoritarian, Moorish sovereign citizenc ideology, and BIE ideology.

While the report does target an extremist group with a black skin color, Scott Walter, president of Capital Research Center told Fox News that this isn’t about race, but about extremist violence.

“It’s not racial profiling, it’s violence profiling,” said Walter. “Identity politics can kill, whether it’s white identity politics, which killed in Charlottesville, or black identity politics, which kills cops.”

“We have to be able to distinguish between free speech and violence,” Walter added. “[Many] longtime [black] activist groups were not obsessed with violence.”

Randy Sutton, a former Las Vegas law enforcement official, said that this report should also not be taken as a negative view on protesting.

“Nobody is saying anything negative about protests,” Sutton said, “Protesting is everyone’s right. This is about commiting acts of violence. Many Black Lives Matter protests call for violence against police, with chants like ‘What do we want?’ and ‘Dead cops!’ It’s terrorism, and it’s no different than Islamic terrorism.”