Former Texas senator and perfect example of how not to run a gubernatorial campaign in Texas, Wendy Davis, recently wrote that she’s considering another run for office in the state that flat out rejected her.

Davis rose to popularity — more so with leftist coastals than Texans — when she filibustered a pro-life bill in pink tennis shoes  for 11 hours. The media couldn’t get enough of her, and that somehow put the idea into her head that she could win the governor’s chair in one of the most red states in the nation.

She was, as history will show, so horribly wrong that her run for governor became a national embarrassment for leftists, and a laughing stock for everyone else.

In an interview with Cosmo, Davis informed wrote that she was “trying to figure out when I should put myself back out there, and when will the electoral climate in Texas be right for me.”

Judging by how horribly she lost the last election, mocked relentlessly for her platform, had to get most of her campaign money out of state, and has seemingly doubled down on her radical leftist stances, it’s a safe bet to think Davis will never find a suitable electoral climate in Texas.

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In fact, when last she tried to raise money for her gubernatorial campaign on the anniversary of her filibuster, so few people wanted to pay the $20 to see her that she actually had to give tickets away just to save face.

But nevertheless, Davis wants to persist…for some reason.

“I want to serve this state,” she wrote. “I see so much that needs to be done, and I want to play a role in helping making it happen. So I’ll keep asking myself these important questions until I figure it out.”

There’s little to figure out. Davis is a would be leftist darling who got a standing ovation from a fawning media during a time when Jessica Valenti-esque feminism was in style, and Democrats were scraping the bottom of the barrel for someone — anyone — to run against a Republican power house.

Davis was never going to win, and the activists and their Democrat captains knew that. I know, because they told me themselves.

Davis’s purpose was was to help create outrage generating talking points and headlines about women’s rights, abortion, and other things. It was to activate a sleeping radical base with narratives of unfair treatment toward (insert supposed Democrat voting bloc here), and anger toward those evil Republicans.

She was, for all intents and purposes, a Democratic side show.

But Davis’s run couldn’t even accomplish its intended purpose. Now the ship has sailed, and Davis was left floundering in the water behind it. People hardly remember Davis exists until she gives an interview in a feminist friendly magazine like Cosmo.